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A Robot Named Rasmussen

on June 16, 2017 - 9:06am

Looking into the robot Rasmussen at the Project Y STEM Center in the Pueblo Complex on Diamond Drive. Photo by Maire O'Neill/

Members of the Project Y Team 4153 robotics club with their robot Rasmussen. Courtesy photo


Los Alamos Daily Post

Rasmussen is a robot built at the Project Y STEM Center in Los Alamos by high school students and their adult mentors. She is named after Jane Rasmussen who was a part of the Manhattan Project and used early computers at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

“Jane Rasmussen was not necessarily in the limelight but she

Los Alamos Scientist Awarded Giuliano Preparata Medal

on June 15, 2017 - 10:35am


Los Alamos scientist Dr. Thomas Claytor was awarded the Giuliano Preparata Medal June 8 in Piedmont, Italy. Photo by Maire O'Neill/


Los Alamos

A Los Alamos scientist known for a modified cold fusion experiment in which he repeatedly got radioactive tritium produced in a low energy system, has been presented with the prestigious Giuliano Preparato Medal. Dr.

Thursday Science On Tap: Space Weather

on June 14, 2017 - 6:35pm


Space is not a dark, cold void as many people think. Instead, it churns with energy—in the form of accelerated particles—that come to us through the sun’s activity. The resulting sunspots and solar storms can disrupt communications, compromise power grids, and even influence your day-to-day life on Earth.

Come to Science On Tap at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 15 at UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square, where Geoff Reeves, with the Lab’s Space Science & Applications group, will talk about his research on just how space weather impacts our planet and the

Rotarians Visit Tibbar Plasma Technologies

on June 14, 2017 - 7:50am

Twenty-five Los Alamos Rotarians pay a visit Tuesday afternoon to Tibbar Plasma Technologies at 274 DP Road as part of a vocational tour. Owner Rick Nebel gave a presentation to the group about the company and its revolutionary new plasma-based technology for high voltage direct current (HVDC) converters. The presentation was followed by a tour of the company's lab. Photo by Laura Loy

Rotarians visit Tibbar Plasma Technologies Tuesday as part of a vocational tour. Courtesy/Laura Loy

Physicist Speaks On 'No Wonder You Wonder!'

on June 10, 2017 - 7:26am
Cover of 'No Wonder You Wonder!' by Claude Phipps. Phipps will speak Thursday, June 15 at Mesa Public Library. Courtesy photo

Claude Phipps


What holds a satellite up while it goes around the earth? Why can’t you travel back in time? These are just two of the many questions explored by Claude Phipps in his book “No Wonder You Wonder!” published by Springer International in 2016. Phipps will speak at Mesa Public Library, 7 p.m., Thursday, June 15 in the Upstairs Rotunda. The talk will be followed by a book-signing.

Phipps has degrees from MIT and Stanford, and has spent his

C’YA Provides Science Education To Students

on June 10, 2017 - 7:19am
Chad Lauritzen, seen here at Dixon Elementary School, volunteered to teach science through Champions of Youth Ambitions. The organization celebrates its third anniversary this weekend since gaining its non-profit status in 2014. Photo by Bernadette Lauritzen
The very first LANL Foundation grant funded this opportunity for the Future PhDs of Dixon Elementary. Lauritzen still teaches there more than three years later. Photo by Bernadette Lauritzen
​Los Alamos 

Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA), a local non-profit will celebrate its third anniversary this

‘Charliecloud’ Simplifies Big Data Supercomputing

on June 7, 2017 - 4:48pm

Streamlined code from Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists Reid Priedhorsky and Tim Randles aims to simplify supercomputer use. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  •  Los Alamos Releases Elegantly Simple High-performance ‘Convenience Bubble’

At Los Alamos National Laboratory, home to more than 100 supercomputers since the dawn of the computing era, elegance and simplicity of programming are highly valued but not always achieved.

LAFSF Summer Series Continues June 14

on June 7, 2017 - 2:18pm
Morrie Pongratz will present the third installment of the Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum’s summer series Wednesday, June 14.
The theme of the talks is “Hope: Science, Religion and the Future”. In this third presentation we encounter “evolution” and discuss the impact of Darwin’s work on our concept of God and the cosmos. The talk will highlight the insights of the scientist and theologian, Teilhard de Chardin, S.J., the author of “The Phenomenon of Man”.
The talk will also introduce the work of Georgetown University’s Distinguished Research Professor John Haught,

Brain Waves: Art And Science In Dialogue

on June 5, 2017 - 2:17pm
Brain Waves machine. Courtesy photo
NNMC News:
A mind reading device that translates thoughts into drops of water. It might sound like the plot to a sci-fi movie, but it’s in fact a real-life collaborative project between an artist, a professor and four Northern New Mexico College engineering students.
The project started as the brainchild of Embudo-based ceramicist and glassmaker Shel Neymark, who has been fascinated by the power of the human brain and attempting to reflect its mysteries in his work.
“One thing about the brain that’s so interesting is that it’s electrical and

LANL: Girls In STEM Aims To Boost Interest In Science Careers

on June 5, 2017 - 10:42am

Girls from a Northern New Mexico school look on as Amanda Madden, of LANL’s Space Science & Applications group, demonstrates how to build a spectrometer. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • LANL Foundation-funded summer series kicks off today at Abiquiu Elementary

Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Elizabeth Coronado and Kelsey Neal, with support from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation, recently launched a project called Girls in STEM, which aims to improve girls’ attitudes toward science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

“Our hope is that as attitudes improve, girls will be more

Los Alamos Faith And Science Forum 2017 Summer Series Presents Talk By Gerry Wood Wednesday, June 7

on June 4, 2017 - 10:40am

Nels Hoffman speaking at the May 31 Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum. Photo by Morrie Pongratz

LAF&SF News:

This summer the non-denominational Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum (LAF&SF) is presenting a series of talks by local speakers. The theme of the talks is “Hope: Science, Religion and the Future”.

Gerry Wood is next in line to speak and he will address “The Science of Hope” at the Wednesday, June 7 forum. Wood had a 35-year career at Los Alamos National Laboratory after obtaining a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin.

Wednesday's forum includes a light

Rover Findings Indicate Stratified Lake On Ancient Mars

on June 2, 2017 - 10:31am

Sedimentary Signs of a Martian Lakebed (Shallow Part): This evenly layered rock imaged in 2014 by the Mastcam on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows a pattern typical of a lake-floor sedimentary deposit near where flowing water entered a lake. Shallow and deep parts of an ancient Martian lake left different clues in mudstone formed from lakebed deposits. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Water carried more oxygen at certain times, depths

A long-lasting lake on ancient Mars provided stable environmental conditions that differed significantly from one part of the lake to another, according to a

Study Shows Humans Have Polluted European Air For 2000 Years

on May 31, 2017 - 10:22am

The Colle Gnifetti Glacier on the Swiss-Italian border where the ice core used in the study was taken. In the bottom right corner, the coring stie can be seen. Photo by Nicole Spaulding

AGU News:

WASHINGTON, DC — A new study combining European ice core data and historical records of the infamous Black Death pandemic of 1349-1353 shows metal mining and smelting have polluted the environment for thousands of years, challenging the widespread belief that environmental pollution began with the Industrial Revolution in the 1700s and 1800s.

The new study, accepted for publication in GeoHealth, a

LANL: ‘Halos’ Discovered On Mars Widen Time Frame For Potential Life

on May 30, 2017 - 7:04pm

A mosaic of images from the navigation cameras on the NASA Curiosity rover shows ‘halos’ of lighter-toned bedrock around fractures. These halos comprise high concentrations of silica and indicate that liquid groundwater flowed through the rocks in Gale crater longer than previously believed. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech

LANL News:

Lighter-toned bedrock that surrounds fractures and comprises high concentrations of silica—called “halos”—has been found in Gale crater on Mars, indicating that the planet had liquid water much longer than previously believed.

Los Alamos Freshman Lillian Petersen Wins Third Place At Intel International Science And Engineering Fair

on May 28, 2017 - 6:41am

Lillian Petersen places third in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair May 14-19  in Los Angeles. Courtesy photo

LAPS News:

Los Alamos Topper Academy freshman Lillian Petersen competed May 14-19 in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Los Angeles, Calif. Petersen received a third place award for her project in the Earth and Environmental Sciences category. The title of Petersen’s award winning project is, America's Farming Future: The Impact of Climate Change on Crop Yields. Petersen was awarded a $1,000 scholarship by Intel.

Also competing at the

Whole New Jupiter: First Science Results From NASA’s Juno Mission Show Gigantic Turbulent World

on May 27, 2017 - 7:41am
Through the Juno mission, scientists are learning more about the largest planet in the solar system. NASA/JPL-CalTech/USGS Photo
NASA News: 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in the solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.
“We are excited to share these early

Three Los Alamos National Laboratory Teams Receive DOE Secretary Appreciation Awards

on May 26, 2017 - 6:45am

Dimitri Kusnezov (NNSA), Sara Del Valle, Paul Fenimore, Kirsten McCabe and LANL Charlie McMillan at the April 11 awards ceremony. Courtesy/LANL

Dimitri Kusnezov (NNSA) presents Kirsten McCabe and Paul Dotson with their awards during the April 11 ceremony. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

Three teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory were the recent recipients of the Department of Energy’s Secretary Appreciation Awards for their exceptional contributions to the agency’s mission.

The Laboratory’s Ebola Task Force, Cancer Moonshot team and Technology Convergence Working Group were all recognized in

Students Enjoy Hands-On Science At Bradbury

on May 26, 2017 - 5:03am
Taos High School student is captivated by the Human Battery hands on exhibit. Photo by KayLinda Crawford/BSMA
Taos High School student studies the hands-on Matchstick Puzzle. Photo by KayLinda Crawford/BSMA

BSMA News:

Twenty-two Taos High School students enjoyed the hands-on science activities at the Bradbury Science Museum, thanks to the bus ride paid for by the Bradbury Science Museum Association.

“Getting the bus ride funding made such a huge difference for us!” said Ines Firmo, Taos High School special education science teacher.

PEEC Offers Geology Tour Of Mount Taylor

on May 26, 2017 - 5:01am
Mount Taylor has a fascinating geologic story, one that can be told by Fraser and Cathy Goff. Photo by Fraser Goff

PEEC News:

The Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) is offering a special overnight tour June 17-18 of the Mount Taylor region. The tour will focus on the geology of the area, and is suitable for geologists and non-geologists alike. Space is limited for this trip.

Geologists Fraser and Cathy Goff will lead the tour, which will include the earth science and volcanology of Mount Taylor and surrounding areas.

Udall, Heinrich Urge Against NASA Funding Cuts

on May 22, 2017 - 10:20am
WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich urged the Senate Appropriations Committee to support NASA’s Office of Education in the coming fiscal year despite a proposal by President Trump to eliminate the office, which works to inspire and educate students across the country to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).
NASA’s Office of Education programs include the Space Grant College and Fellowship Program -- a competitive, state-federal partnership that functions through consortia in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the

Ice Particles In Earth’s Atmosphere Create Glints

on May 18, 2017 - 8:46am
One million miles from Earth, a NASA camera is capturing unexpected flashes of light reflecting off Earth. Courtesy/NASA
AGU News:
WASHINGTON, D.C. — One million miles from Earth, a NASA camera is capturing unexpected flashes of light reflecting off Earth.
The homeward-facing instrument on NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, launched in 2015, caught hundreds of these flashes over the span of a year. NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument aboard DSCOVR is taking almost-hourly images of the sunlit planet from its spot between Earth and the sun.

Four LAHS Students Compete At Intel ISEF

on May 17, 2017 - 8:53am

LAHS juniors Priyanka Velappan, Alex Ionkov and Sophia Li and freshman Lillian Peterson are competing this week at the Intel ISEF in Los Angeles, Calif. Courtesy photo

LAHS News:

Four Los Alamos High School students are competing May 14-19 at Intel's International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) in Los Angeles, Calif.

LAHS juniors Priyanka Velappan, Alex Ionkov and Sophia Li, along with freshman Lillian Peterson won all expense paid trips to Intel ISEF by winning Grand Awards at the Northeastern New Mexico Science and Engineering Fair and the New Mexico State Science and Fair.

Science On Tap: Discovering Boron On Mars May 18

on May 16, 2017 - 7:09pm
LACD News:
Although the NASA Curiosity rover has investigated Mars since August 2012, it has only recently detected boron on the planet.
The presence of this element has implications for questions about abundant water, prebiotic chemistry, and the habitability of Mars. The ChemCam instrument, which has been vital to this research, was a joint effort between Los Alamos and the French Space Agency, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales.
Come and hear Patrick Gasda, of the Lab’s Space and Remote Sensing group, talk about what has been learned through this special and unique equipment

Los Alamos Faith And Science Forum Launches 2017 Summer Series

on May 16, 2017 - 7:07am


Again this summer the Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum will present a series of talks by local speakers during May, June and July. The theme of the talks is “Hope: Science, Religion and the Future”. There will be seven Wednesday evening meetings including May 31; June 7, 14, 28 and July 12, 19, 26.

The meetings will follow the usual format: light supper at 6 p.m., talk at 6:30 p.m., followed by questions for the speaker and then table discussions.

Letter To The Editor: Response To Dr. Neeper

on May 9, 2017 - 7:53am
Los Alamos
This is a brief reply to Dr. Neeper’s recent letter (link). First of all, I did not suggest that people should go to work for private industry. I suggested that they form their own companies and go to work for themselves. That way you set your own corporate values, and those values can help restore credibility to science. That’s a little different than working for R J Reynolds.
I also think that volunteering is great, but volunteering isn’t going to create research jobs. We need to grow research, and taking the entrepreneurial route is one way to do that.