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KAFB: Air Force Research Laboratory To Rendezvous And Inspect Malfunctioning S5 Satellite

on October 20, 2019 - 8:34am
KAFB News:
 
KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE The Air Force Research Laboratory will begin maneuvers today, Oct. 20, as the first-ever inspection mission to support real-time on-orbit spacecraft anomaly resolution operations.
 
This effort will be a rendezvous between the experimental Mycroft satellite and a second experimental AFRL satellite called the Small Satellite Space Surveillance System, or S5. The S5, launched Feb. 22, 2019, is a small satellite designed to test affordable SmallSat space situational awareness constellation technologies.
 
AFRL has experienced communication challenges

Science On Tap With Dr. Mark Boslough Oct. 21

on October 19, 2019 - 6:21am
Dr. Mark Boslough
 
Los Alamos Creative District News:
 
Join the Bradbury Science Museum and the Los Alamos Creative District for Science On Tap at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 21 at projectY cowork, 150 Central Park Square.
 
This On Tap will feature a conversation with Dr. Mark Boslough about uncertainty and risk at the planetary catastrophe threshold.
 
What is the probability that the Earth will be wiped out, in our lifetimes, by the impact of an enormous asteroid or comet? How does it compare with the self-inflicted threat of catastrophic global warming?
 
Should we worry more

More Detail On Giant LANL Rotor

on October 18, 2019 - 6:23pm
A truck convoy transporting a giant rotor headed out today from Los Alamos National Laboratory and is shown here this morning passing the ‘Y’ on N.M. 4 near White Rock. Photo/Copyright 2019 by Leigh House
 
By LEIGH HOUSE
Los Alamos
 
The rotor (spinning part) of a very large motor-generator was found to need repairs at a specialized repair site in Virginia.
 
The first part of this trip to repair it will be by truck that will take it to a rail station. Because it is so large and so heavy, it required a special truck assembly to move it.

AGU: Radioactive Chlorine From Nuclear Bomb Tests Remain Present In Antarctica

on October 18, 2019 - 10:19am
New research finds some glaciers in Antarctica are still releasing radioactive chlorine-36 created during 1950s nuclear weapons tests. Courtesy/NASA/Joe MacGregor
 
Vostok and Talos Dome are both shown on this map of Antarctica. Vostok is still releasing anthropogenic chlorine-36 into the atmosphere. Courtesy/AGU
 
AGU News:
 
Antarctica’s ice sheets are still releasing radioactive chlorine from marine nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s, a new study finds.
 
This suggests regions in Antarctica store and vent the radioactive element differently than previously thought.

Rotary: Espanola Y Teen Center Director Sandoval

on October 18, 2019 - 7:40am

Ben Sandoval, director of the YMCA Teen Center in Espanola, recently spoke at the Rotary Club of Los Alamos about Team Intergalactic, the students from the YMCA who traveled to China in July to compete in the Entrepreneurial Challenge Category of the RoboRAVE International robotics competition. The project had to show an application for improving conditions in the world. Sandoval and three students of the eight-person team were able to travel to Guangdong with their project, a robotic, programmable solar-and-wind-powered irrigation system on a track, which had already won at regional levels.

University Of Arizona Astronomer Receives Packard Fellowship To Pursue Black Hole Research

on October 17, 2019 - 8:35am
Astronomer Peter Behroozi
 
UA News:
 
TUCSON, Ariz. — University of Arizona astronomer Peter Behroozi was selected by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation as a Packard Fellow for Science and Engineering, which comes with a grant of $875,000 over five years to pursue research.
 
This year’s class of fellows features 22 early-career scientists and engineers. The Packard Fellowships in Science and Engineering are among the nation’s largest nongovernmental fellowships, designed to allow maximum flexibility in how the funding is used.
 
Since 1988, the program has supported the blue-sky

Seven Los Alamos Scientists And Engineers Honored As 2019 Laboratory Fellows

on October 16, 2019 - 9:38am

2019 Lab Fellows from top left, Brian Albright, Patrick Chain, Dana Dattelbaum, Michael Hamada, Anna Hayes-Sterbenz, Michael Prime and Laura Smilowitz. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Brian Albright, Patrick Chain, Dana Dattelbaum, Michael Hamada, Anna Hayes-Sterbenz, Michael Prime and Laura Smilowitz become part of a prestigious fellowship.

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and engineers Brian Albright, Patrick Chain, Dana Dattelbaum, Michael Hamada, Anna Hayes-Sterbenz, Michael Prime and Laura Smilowitz are being honored as 2019 Laboratory fellows.

“Los Alamos National Laboratory

Extreme Solar Storms May Actually Be More Frequent

on October 14, 2019 - 12:58pm
This visualization depicts what a coronal mass ejection might look like as it interacts with the interplanetary medium and magnetic forces. Courtesy/NASA/Steele Hill
 
An image from NASA’s Solar Dynamic Observatory shows a giant sunspot present in 2014. The sunspot spanned 80,000 miles. Courtesy/NASA/SDO
 
AGU News:
 
Researchers propose in a new study why an extreme solar storm in 1859 was so damaging to Earth’s magnetic field. They compared the storm with other extreme storms in history, suggesting this storm is not likely unique.
 
The September 1859 Carrington Event ejected

Iron Magma Could Explain Psyche Density Puzzle

on October 13, 2019 - 11:31am
UA News:
 
TUCSON, Ariz. — The metallic asteroid Psyche has mystified scientists because it is less dense than it should be.
 
Now, a new theory by researchers including scientists at the University of Arizona, could explain Psyche's low density and metallic surface.
 
Psyche, the largest known metallic asteroid in the solar system, is located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Psyche appears to be composed largely of iron and nickel, rather than rocky rubble, like most asteroids, yet its density is estimated to be only about half that of an iron meteorite.
 
Metal-rich

UC President Janet Napolitano And Triad’s Thom Mason Present $599,600 Grant To LANL Foundation

on October 12, 2019 - 9:53am
University of California President Janet Napolitano, right, and LANL Director and Triad President Thom Mason, left, present funding to LANL Foundation President/CEO Jenny Parks and board members Bill Wadt, Denise Thronas, Nan Sauer, Billie Blair, Tania Sanchez, Elmer Torres, Wilmer Chavarria and Hervey Juris during a recent event. Courtesy/LANLF
 
Melisha Martinez, TESOL certification candidate, builds skills to better serving dual-language students at La Tierra Montessori School www.lanlfoundation.org/melisha-martinez. Courtesy/LANLF
 
LANL FOUNDATION News:
  • Triad grant supports K-12

Capacity Crowd Hears Jim Eckles Talk On Trinity Site

on October 12, 2019 - 7:09am

Author Jim Eckles of ‘Trinity – The History Of An Atomic Bomb National Historic Landmark’, shares his knowledge about Trinity Site with a packed room Thursday at the Bradbury Science Museum. Photo by KayLinda Crawford/ladailypost.com

Photo by KayLinda Crawford

Alden Oyer Presents Technical Talk At LANL Oct. 14

on October 11, 2019 - 9:39am
Alden Oyer
 
LANL News:
 
The Los Alamos Northern New Mexico Section is sponsoring a technical talk open to the public at noon Oct. 14 at the LANL Library JRO 1/2 (turn right upon entering the Oppenheimer Study Center.
 
Abstract: Near Vertical Incidence Skywave (NVIS) propagation is useful to establish communications over short to moderate distances where line-of-sight communications is not available. This presentation will discuss the phenomenon and applicability of NVIS, and describe antennas parameters suitable to exploit this propagation.
 
Biography: Alden Oyer is retired from

Heinrich Announces Youth Climate Change Challenge

on October 10, 2019 - 1:44pm
U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) announced the Youth Climate Change Challenge. He is inviting New Mexico students from grades K-12 to submit drawings, paintings, poetry, and short essays about what the climate crisis means for them.
 
Senator Heinrich will visit the classrooms of the first-place winners.
 
“When I meet with students in New Mexico calling for climate action, I am always impressed with their depth of knowledge on climate science, their observations of how climate change is already impacting their daily

LANL: Modified Quantum Dots Capture More Energy From Light And Lose Less To Heat

on October 7, 2019 - 1:31pm

Doping a quantum dot with manganese (right half of graphic) speeds the capture of energy from a hot electron to 0.15 picoseconds, outpacing losses to phonons in the crystal lattice. Courtesy/LANL

 

LANL News:

  • Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers discover a new approach for capturing energy from light-generated, ‘hot’ electrons, avoiding wasteful heat loss

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have synthesized magnetically-doped quantum dots that capture the kinetic energy of electrons created by ultraviolet light before it’s wasted as heat.

 

“This discovery can potentially

LANL: Ancient Oasis Once Existed On Mars ... New Findings From ChemCam Show Dynamic Climate

on October 7, 2019 - 12:19pm

The ChemCam – short for ‘chemistry’ and ‘camera’ – sits atop NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover. It shoots a laser at Martian rocks to analyze their chemical make-up, which gives researchers clues into the planet’s past habitability. The instrument was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in conjunction with the French space agency. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

LANL News:

 

The surface of Mars was once home to shallow, salty ponds that went through episodes of overflow and drying, according to a paper published today in Nature Geoscience.

 

These findings result from an analysis of

NMEDD Announces New Members Of Technology Research Collaborative Board

on October 7, 2019 - 11:48am
 
NMEDD News:
 
SANTA FE The New Mexico Economic Development Department's (NMEDD) Science and Technology Division has named new board members for the Technology Research Collaborative (TRC).
 
The TRC was formalized in 2003, with the goal of promoting technology commercialization in New Mexico, increasing high-paying jobs and diversifying the economy.
 
In Fiscal Year 2020, the TRC will serve as mentors to science & technology businesses in New Mexico. The board's short-term goals include leveraging its expertise to assist businesses applying for Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)

Northern New Mexico College Community Day Oct. 18

on October 7, 2019 - 8:51am

Four Local Science & Tech Startups Receive Awards

on October 4, 2019 - 9:03am
NMED News:
 
SANTA FE New Mexico Economic Development Department (NMEDD) Office of Science and Technology announced that four New Mexico companies, including Biodidact in Los Alamos, will receive Innovation Voucher Grants to help their businesses grow by covering eligible expenses at a state certified incubator, a business accelerator, or a state approved co-working space.
 
“These grants help small start-up companies at a critical stage of growth,” Deputy Cabinet Secretary Jon Clark said.

BSMA: Trinity Site Myths & Things You Might Not Know

on October 3, 2019 - 8:35pm

Jim Eckles leading a tour at the Trinity Site, will speak on the subject at 1 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10. Courtesy/BSMA

BSMA News:

The basic events of Trinity Site, where the first atomic bomb was tested on July 16, 1945, have been told and retold in dozens upon dozens of books, articles and television features.

Jim Eckles also has written about Trinity Site but has the perspective of conducting innumerable tours of the site and meeting veterans of the test since 1977.  He will explain that the dunes at White Sands National Monument were NOT bleached by the atomic blast, that the soldiers at

Water Distribution Affects Exoplanets Habitable Zone

on October 3, 2019 - 6:54am
Earth is an example of an aqua planet that maintains its water in a habitable zone. This image of Earth taken by the spacecraft Galileo shows its vast Pacific Ocean. Courtesy/NASA/JPL
 
Mars is an example of a potentially Earth-like planet that lost its liquid water and atmosphere. Courtesy/NASA/JPL/USGS
 
AGU News:
 
Earth-like exoplanets with dry tropical regions can remain habitable at a closer distance to their host star than previously thought, a new study suggests.
 
Because life on Earth requires liquid water, researchers looking for life beyond Earth’s solar system search for

AGU: Report Addresses Flooding In Communities

on September 30, 2019 - 1:21pm
A school bus drives through flooded streets in Houston, Texas Sept. 19 after heavy rain from Tropical Depression Imelda caused one of the worst flash floods in U.S. history. Courtesy/Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images News/Getty Images
 
AGU News:
 
AGU’s global community of Earth and space scientists has contributed research and expertise to our understanding of—and solutions for—climate change, natural hazards, and their related impacts on people.
 
Climate change, the increasing severity of extreme weather, and resulting floods are health and economic crises that we cannot ignore.
 
To

PEEC: Thank You Triad National Security!

on September 28, 2019 - 9:11am
Kindergarteners get outside and explore patterns and shapes in nature on PEEC’s field trips. These field trips and other work are funded through the generosity of granters like Triad National Security. Photo by Bob Walker
 
Photo by Bob Walker
 
PEEC News:
 
Thanks to the generosity of Triad National Security, a lot more kids will be getting out on the trails and into nature to learn science through hands-on lessons.
 
Triad recently granted the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) $5,000 to continue its work getting students outside for engaging science learning.
 
An

STEM Pathways For Girls Conference Oct. 5

on September 28, 2019 - 8:13am

STEM Santa Fe News:

STEM Santa Fe will hold its annual STEM Pathways for Girls conference, Saturday Oct. 5 at Santa Fe Community College, for Northern New Mexico girls in fifth through eighth grades.

This day-long event is designed to inspire and enhance the interest of 150 girls in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

The conference is designed to give the impressionable young ladies a better appreciation of STEM and to demonstrate how they can use STEM to question, explore, challenge and change their world. 

The conference (formerly “Expanding Your Horizons”) kicks

BSMA: Gadgets Ribbon Cutting Thursday Oct. 10

on September 25, 2019 - 4:58pm

BSMA, Friends & Family Set Up New Gadgets Store

on September 24, 2019 - 10:03am
Members of the Bradbury Science Museum Association Board together with friends, family and neighbors pitched in Sunday to move Gadgets into its new store space adjacent to the fountain at the Bradbury Science Museum at 15th Street and Central Avenue. The grand opening celebration for Gadgets in its new location will be announced shortly. Photo by KayLinda Crawford/ladailypost.com
 
Scene from Gadgets move Sunday into its new store space adjacent to the fountain at the Bradbury Science Museum. Photo by KayLinda Crawford/ladailypost.com
 
Scene from Gadgets move Sunday into its new store space

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