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AGU: Climate Change May Shift Summer Thunderstorms

on June 15, 2019 - 10:18am
Thunderstorm seen from Belfort, France. Courtesy/Thomas Bresson, Flickr
 
AGU News:
 
Climate change could affect the regularity of summer afternoon thunderstorms in some parts of the world, according to new research.
 
A new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters modeled weather patterns in western Germany, northern France and parts of Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg, under climate change.
 
Under a strong climate scenario, where greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase, extreme summer thunderstorms in these areas might break out more often overnight and

Take A Tour Of Stonehenge At Nature Center Friday

on June 13, 2019 - 5:13pm

Head to the Los Alamos Nature Center this weekend to learn about Stonehenge and Sea Monsters. Akkana Peck and Dave North will lead a discussion on Stonehenge at 6 p.m. Friday, June 14. The nature center will show the full-dome film 'Sea Monsters: A Prehistoric Adventure' at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 15. Courtesy/PEEC

 

PEEC News:

 

Take a tour of Stonehenge and some of its relatives this Friday, June 14 at the Los Alamos Nature Center. Dave North and Akkana Peck will discuss what Stonehenge and similar monuments can — and can’t — tell us about ancient astronomy. This talk begins at 6 p.m.

Los Alamos County Council Green Lights Pebble Labs Plan To Advance Business

on June 13, 2019 - 7:30am
Council Chambers is filled with Pebble Labs employees Tuesday night. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com
 
By KIRSTEN LASKEY
Los Alamos Daily Post
 

Tuesday night, employees from Pebble Labs filled Los Alamos County Council Chambers to state their case on why council should support the budding biotech research company.

Pebble Labs employees’ efforts were successful. Los Alamos County Council unanimously approved an ordinance adopting an economic development project for public support of Pebble Labs.

Los Alamos National Laboratory All-Woman Team Commands Rock-Zapping Laser On Mars

on June 12, 2019 - 9:53am

Members of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s ChemCam Engineering Operations team, from left, Suzi Montano, Adriana Reyes-Newell, Roberta Beal, Lisa Danielson, Nina Lanza and Cindy Little. Not pictured is Margie Root. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

The laser that zaps rocks on Mars is commanded by a talented group of engineers and scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory—who also happen to all be women, a rarity in the engineering field.

“It’s unusual, simply because engineering still tends to be male-dominated,” said Nina Lanza, a planetary scientist on the team who has helped recruit some

AGU: China’s Bioluminescent Seas Glowing Brighter

on June 12, 2019 - 8:24am

Blue bioluminescence produced by red Noctiluca scintillans near Taiwan’s Matsu Islands. Researchers now have a way to study the sparkly organisms by satellite. Courtesy/Yu-Xian Yang, Lienchiang County Government, Taiwan

 

AGU News:

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Scientists have, for the first time, used satellites to track the bioluminescent plankton responsible for producing “blue tears” in China’s coastal waters and found the sparkly creatures have become more abundant in recent years.

 

Red Noctiluca scintillans are single-celled organisms found in coastal waters all over the world.

Science On Tap With Antonio Redondo June 17

on June 12, 2019 - 7:20am
LANL researcher Antonio Redondo
 
Creative District News:
 
The community is invited to join the Bradbury Science Museum and Los Alamos Creative District for Science On Tap at 5:30 p.m., Monday, June 17, at projectY cowork in Central Park Square.
 
This On Tap will feature a conservation with Antonio Redondo about the use of super-computer simulations in the study of chemical processes.
 
Many are familiar with the M&M’s tagline, “Melts in your mouth, not in your hand,” but most don’t give much thought to the science responsible for that crunchy candy shell.

Tiny Light Box Opens New Doors Into Nanoworld

on June 12, 2019 - 7:10am
Using a box of stacked atomically thin layers of tungsten disulphide, Chalmers researchers have succeeded in creating a type of feedback loop in which light and matter become one. Courtesy/Denis Baranov/Yen Strandqvist/Chalmers University of Technology
 
Chalmers University of Technology News:
 
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a completely new way of capturing, amplifying and linking light to matter at the nanolevel.
 
Using a tiny box, built from stacked atomically thin material, they have succeeded in creating a type of feedback loop in which

What’s At The Bradbury This Month

on June 11, 2019 - 7:43am
BSM News:
 
Night with a Nerd
 
Each summer, monsoon season arrives in New Mexico, bringing torrential rains, intense thunderstorms, damaging hail storms, and deadly tornados with it. In spite of these extreme and intimidating weather events, locals are generally glad to see the start of the monsoon. As the source of over half the year’s precipitation, the monsoon brings life-giving water to a state which is often parched.
 
The Bradbury’s National Outreach Traveling Exhibits Program (NOTEs)
 
Over the course of 4 months, Building Immunityguided over 200,000 visitors through the amazing and often

AGU: Loss Of Arctic Sea Ice Stokes Summer Heat Waves In Southern U.S.

on June 7, 2019 - 5:14pm
Composites of summer extreme (left panels) and oppressive heat wave (right panels) frequency during summers of low (top), neutral (middle) and high (bottom) Hudson Bay sea ice extent. Courtesy/AGU
 
AGU News:
 
Over the last 40 years, Arctic sea ice thickness, extent and volume have declined dramatically. Now, a new study finds a link between declining sea ice coverage in parts of the Canadian Arctic and an increasing incidence of summer heat waves across the southern United States.
 
The new study in AGU’s Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres explores how seasonal fluctuations

LANL Experts To discuss ‘The Science Of Vintage Space’ On Santa Fe Institute Panel 4:15-5:15 P.M. June 15

on June 7, 2019 - 4:25pm

Norris Bradbury, left, in front of the Kiwi B4-A reactor used to power a nuclear rocket in the 1960s as part of Project Rover. Courtesy/LANL

 

LANL News:

 

Los Alamos National Laboratory will host a panel at the Santa Fe Institute's InterPlanetary Festival about the Science of Vintage Space June 15 in Santa Fe.

 

The event is free and open to the public.

 

Both current and retired experts from the Laboratory will talk about the critical role LANL played in the early days of the space race, such as developing sensors for satellites to detect nuclear explosions in space that resulted

Thomas Intrator Scholarship Winners For 2019 Are Joseph Sarrao And Javier McTeague-Vasquez

on June 6, 2019 - 9:13am

The 2019 Thomas Intrator scholarship recipients Joseph Sarrao, left, and Javier McTeague-Vasquez. Jessica Booton Photography, www.jessicabootonphotography.com/


LAPS Foundation News:

 

The family of Thomas Intrator has announced its selection for this year’s Thomas Intrator Scholarship are 2019 Los Alamos High School graduates Joseph Sarrao and Javier McTeigue-Vasquez.

 

The scholarship honors Thomas Intrator, who was a distinguished plasma physicist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He encouraged, fostered and practiced a sense of curiosity.

Los Alamos Faith & Science Forum Features Reinovsky

on June 6, 2019 - 7:06am

Bob Reinovsky speaks at the first lecture of the Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum’s Summer Series Wednesday evening at the Unitarian Church. Photo by Morrie Pongratz

LAF&SF News:

Bob Reinovsky was the first speaker of Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum’s Summer Series.

Reinovsky, a program manager at Los Alamos National Laboratory, spoke to a full house Wednesday evening at the Unitarian Church.

AGU: Earthquake In 2009 Intensifies American Samoa’s Rising Sea Levels

on June 5, 2019 - 7:00am
Crews working near the damage from the 2009 tsunami in American Samoa. Courtesy/Lorn Cramer/Flickr, Wikimedia Commons
 
 
AGU News:
 
The 2009, magnitude-8.1 Samoa earthquake dealt a great deal of damage to the Samoan Islands: Tsunami waves as high as 14 meters (46 feet) wiped out multiple villages, claiming nearly 200 lives and severely damaging water and electrical systems.
 
New research reveals the damage is likely to continue in the island Tutuila, also known as American Samoa.

Los Alamos ScienceFest Features ‘Eureka!’ Discoveries, STEM Learning, Free Chevel Shepherd Concert

on June 5, 2019 - 6:34am
COUNTY News:
 
The highly anticipated, award-winning, iconic Los Alamos ScienceFest returns this July with new events, including a free concert with the winner of The Voice and New Mexico native Chevel Shepherd Friday, July 12.
 
With six days of discoveries, learning and scientific fun in Los Alamos—the home of groundbreaking science and the place where discoveries are made—this year’s event is themed “Eureka!” and runs July 9-14, with Discovery Day taking place Saturday, July 13.
 
Paying homage to Archimedes and his “Eureka!” moment, which occurred in a bathtub, as well as

Enterprise Bank Provides 796 Students With Visit To Bradbury Science Museum In Spring 2019

on June 4, 2019 - 4:25pm

Students from McCurdy Elementary enjoy visiting the Bradbury Science Museum recently. Courtesy/BSMA

BSMA News:

In partnership with the Bradbury Science Museum Association (BSMA), Enterprise Bank (EB&T), formerly Los Alamos National Bank (LANB), recently provided transportation for 796 students to visit the Bradbury Science Museum during Spring 2019.

The BSMA/EB&T partnership has enabled students from northern New Mexico Title 1 Schools to travel to the museum and visit Los Alamos.

"Providing students from Title 1 schools with a field trip to the Bradbury Science Museum has been an amazing

Scenes From International Science & Engineering Fair

on May 30, 2019 - 4:47pm

A massive crowd of students and judges assemble prior to entering the exhibition hall May 13-17 for the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Phoenix, Ariz. Los Alamos students earned six prizes and awards during the ISEF.  LAHS student Lillian Kay Peterson earned a $21,000 scholarship for practice robotics innovation as well as the Sigma Xi first place physical science award, which totaled $2,000. She also won the USAID Science and Developmental second place award, which totaled $3,000, and a $1,000 NOAA grand award.

AGU: Aftershocks Of 1959 Earthquake Rocked Yellowstone In 2017-18

on May 30, 2019 - 6:20am
State Highway 287 slumped into Hebgen Lake; damage from the August 1959 Hebgen Lake (Montana-Yellowstone) earthquake. Photo by I.J. Witkind/USGS
 
AGU News:
 
Aug. 17, 1959, back when Dwight D. Eisenhower was president, the U.S. had yet to send a human to space and the nation’s flag sported 49 stars, Yellowstone National Park shook violently for about 30 seconds.
 
The shock was strong enough to drop the ground a full 20 feet in some places. It toppled the dining room fireplace in the Old Faithful Inn. Groundwater swelled up and down in wells as far away as Hawaii.

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Quantum Information Gets Boost From Thin-Film Breakthrough

on May 29, 2019 - 11:00am

An innovative method for controlling single-photon emission for specific locations in 2D materials may offer a new path toward all-optical quantum computers and other quantum technologies. This image shows a false-color scanning electron micrograph of the array used to create place single-photon sources in epitaxial tungsten diselenide. Inset shows the Hanbury-Brown Twiss interferometry measurement proving quantum emission. Image by Michael Pettes/Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Method opens new path to all-optical quantum computers, other technologies

 

Efforts to create reliable light-based

Former Ice Caps Buried Under North Polar Ice On Mars

on May 28, 2019 - 5:59am
A view of Mars showing the planet’s northern polar ice cap. A new study led by The University of Texas at Austin has found remnants of ancient ice caps buried in the north polar region. Courtesy/ISRO / ISSDC / Emily Lakdawalla.
 
A vertically exaggerated view of Mars’ north polar cap. Researchers estimate that if melted, the massive ice deposits discovered in this region would cover the planet in 1.5 meters (5 feet) of water. Courtesy/SA/DLR/FU Berlin; NASA MGS MOLA Science Team.
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.

J. Robert Oppenheimer Committee Awards Scholarships

on May 26, 2019 - 7:14am

J. Robert Oppenheimer. Courtesy/JROMC

JROMC News:

Ten college-bound high school students from Northern New Mexico have been selected for scholarships administered by the J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Committee.

The students are from Los Alamos, Pojoaque Valley and Santa Fe high schools.

The JROMC has awarded over 230 scholarships and other awards totaling more than $500,000 since the program was begun in 1984. The philanthropic organization's scholarship program is supported by several limited term endowments; numerous small, individual donations; and contributions from the Los Alamos

UNM-LA Invites Younger Students To Campus

on May 25, 2019 - 7:08am

Students study forensic investigation during the 2018 Summer Program for Youth at UNM-LA. Photo by Nancy Coombs/UNM-LA

Students study robotics during the 2018 Summer Program for Youth at UNM-LA. Photo by Nancy Coombs/UNM-LA

UNM-LA News:

The UNM-Los Alamos (UNM-LA) Community Education annual Summer Program for Youth (SPY) will take place on the UNM-LA campus July 15 - 26, 2019.

SPY, formerly known as Children’s College, offers week-long camps providing hands-on activities in thematically oriented classes with an emphasis on Science, Math, Art and Technology for students in grades 1-10.

LAHS Student Lillian Petersen Wins Intel ISEF Award

on May 25, 2019 - 5:33am
USAID News:
 
The U.S. Agency for International Development has presented the 2019 Science for Development Award to Lillian Petersen of Los Alamos, at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) in Phoenix, Ariz.
 
Petersen won second place ($3,000 prize) in USAID’s Digital For Development Category for her project, Novel Computational Tool to Inform Cost-Effective Nutrition Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa project. She is a past USAID Science for Development Award recipient.
 
This year Petersen teamed up with another high school student, Garyk Brixi of Potomac,

LANL Profile: Bill Priedhorsky

on May 23, 2019 - 7:53am

Bill Priedhorsky, the program director for Laboratory-Directed Research & Development. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

Bill Priedhorsky, director of the Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD) program, has been walking for several hours.

The whisper of his passage across the desert disappears as thoroughly as the morning dew dries under the unrelenting heat of New Mexico’s sun. He leans on a hiking pole and takes in his surroundings.

There are convoluted shadows on the rocks all about him—nature is a gifted sculptor, using erosion to craft all types of interesting and bizarre shapes

Explore Asteroids Friday; Saturday In Planetarium

on May 23, 2019 - 6:03am
Explore the risks asteroids pose to Earth and what mankind might be able to do about them Friday and Saturday at the Los Alamos Nature Center. Local asteroid expert Galen Gisler will lead a talk at 6 p.m. Friday, May 24, and the nature center will show the full-dome film 'Incoming!' at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 25. Courtesy/PEEC
 
PEEC News:
 
Explore the risks asteroid impacts pose to the Earth this Friday and Saturday at the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium.

SFI: 'Toward A New Understanding Of Aging, Adaptation And The Arrow Of Time' Tonight

on May 21, 2019 - 1:52pm
The Gardens of Ninfa, Italy. Built on the site of a Roman temple to the water nymphs, Ninfa grew into a thriving medieval town of 150 houses. In 1382, it was sacked during Papal wars, and a malaria outbreak left it a ghost town. It is now a public garden. Courtesy photo
 
SFI News:
 
SFI Community Event “Toward a New Understanding of Aging, Adaptation, and the Arrow of TIme” with Jean Carlson at 7:30 p.m. today, May 21 at The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W. San Francisco St., Santa Fe, NM.
 
While time and age in standard dynamical systems are treated as simple clocks that run at

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