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UA-Led OSIRIS-REx Discovers Water On Asteroid, Confirms Bennu As Excellent Mission Target

on December 11, 2018 - 5:19am
This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 PolyCam images collected Dec. 2 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles (24 km). Courtesy/NASA/Goddard/UA
 
UA News:
 
TUCSON, Ariz. — Fst through early December, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft aimed three of its science instruments toward Bennu and began making the mission's first observations of the asteroid.
 
During this period, the spacecraft traveled the last 1.4 million miles (2.2 million km) of its outbound journey to arrive Dec. 3 at a spot 12 miles (19 km) from Bennu.

AGU: Scientists Brew Lava And Blow It Up To Better Understand Volcanoes

on December 10, 2018 - 9:04am

Scientists cooking up 10-gallon batches of molten rock to inject with water. Courtesy/AGU

Scientists study what happens when they inject water into molten rock. Courtesy/AGU

AGU News:

The first results are published from experiments that aim to illuminate the physics of lava-water interactions, which can sometimes make eruptions more dangerous

WASHINGTON, D.C. — What happens when lava and water meet? Explosive experiments with manmade lava are helping to answer this important question.

By cooking up 10-gallon batches of molten rock and injecting them with water, scientists at the State

LANL Director Thom Mason Works With Students During Hour Of Code Project At School In Española

on December 7, 2018 - 5:00pm

Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Thom Mason volunteered for the Hour Of Code project this afternoon at Tony E. Quintana Elementary in Española. The program was presented to the combined 6th grade classes of Nancy Martinez and Danita Quintana. This program provides a one-hour introduction to computer science designed to demystify ‘code’ and show that anyone can learn the basics.

NIST Performance Tests For Aerial Response Robots Become National Standard

on December 7, 2018 - 9:47am
An aerial emergency response robot ready to begin the NIST performance test course. Courtesy/NIST
 
An emergency response drone approaches a bucket-shaped target on the NIST performance test course. Both the capabilities of the robot and the skills of its pilot can be evaluated using the standardized system. Courtesy/NIST
 
NIST News:
 
Tracking the spread of a wildfire. Searching for a missing person. Detecting toxic fumes after an explosion before sending in rescue workers.
 
These are just three of the many tasks being assigned to flying robots known as small unmanned aircraft

Following Recent Federal Climate Report, Udall Urges Immediate Action To Combat Climate Change

on December 6, 2018 - 7:23am
U.S. Sen. Tom Udall
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. Following the recent release of a federal climate report, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) joined a group of his Senate colleagues in calling for bold action to combat climate change.
 
Along with U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Udall and 23 other senators introduced a resolution affirming findings from the recent National Climate Assessment, along with the Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change (IPCC) report, and urging decisive action to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
 
Oct.

AGU: The Oldest Water On Earth

on December 6, 2018 - 7:17am

Salty water deep below the surface of the Earth that hasn’t seen the light of day in millions or even billions of years. Courtesy/AGU

AGU News:

Thousands of feet below the surface of the Earth is salty water that hasn’t seen the light of day in millions or even billions of years.

Miners working deep underground had encountered and wondered about the origin of this water for decades, but it wasn’t until the 1980s that scientists started to investigate where this water was coming from and what it might contain – giving researchers clues into how life survives in the deepest parts of our

LANL: Arctic Ice Model Upgrade To Benefit Polar Research, Industry And Military

on December 5, 2018 - 11:09am

LANL scientist Elizabeth Hunke and her team have released an update to the sea-ice computer model, CICE, that has been a key part of the Arctic predictive capability for the U.S. Navy, NOAA and the National Ice Center. CICE also is widely used for earth-system research in academic and government institutions worldwide. Courtesy/E. Hunke.

 

LANL News:

  • Polar conditions modeled more accurately for naval and commercial safety improvements

An update for an internationally vital sea-ice computer model developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory with several collaborating groups, called CICE

Project VeX Robots Enter Vex IQ Challenge Finals

on December 5, 2018 - 9:43am

Los Alamos Robotics Team named,Project VeX is made up of 5th, 6th, and 7th graders. Last weekend, they traveled to the Vex IQ Challenge in Pinetop, Arizona. Project VeX entered five robots and out of the 45 robots entered, four made it all the way to the Finals! Robot #87544D, created and driven by Filip Velisavljevic and Cam McDonald earned the highest honor, the Elementary School Excellence Award’. Courtesy photo

Project VeX team members hold trophy.Courtesy photo

Project VeX team members at competition. Courtesy photo

TechSource Donates $5,000 To LAPS Foundation

on December 4, 2018 - 4:01pm

From left, LAPS Foundation Executive Director Laura Loy, TechSource CEO Brian D'Andrea and LAPS Foundation Fundraising Chair Karen Hawkins. TechSource Inc., a locally-headquartered science and engineering small business and subcontractor of Triad National Security, donated $5,000 to education in Los Alamos through the LAPS Foundation. The money will be used to foster innovation and growth in the public schools. To learn more about the LAPS Foundation and how to support the local schools, visit www.lapsfoundation.com

OSIRIS-REx Arrives At Asteroid Bennu

on December 4, 2018 - 7:40am
UA News:
 
TUCSON, Ariz. — NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at its destination, asteroid Bennu, Dec. 3. Led by the University of Arizona, the OSIRIS-REx mission is the first NASA mission to visit a near-Earth asteroid, survey the surface, collect a sample and deliver it safely back to Earth.
 
The composition of the asteroid, Bennu, could shed more light on the origins of the solar system.
 
"Initial data from the approach phase show this object to have exceptional scientific value.

SAR Lecture: Chacoan Astronomy, Cosmography, Roads And Ritual Power Jan. 24

on December 4, 2018 - 7:16am
SAR News:
 
SANTA FE A sunray perfectly pierces a spiral rock formation marking the summer solstice; a shadow on a long South wall calls in the equinox. These astronomical alignments, embedded in the structures and roads across the Chaco Canyon region, provide insights into the pre-Colombian Puebloan culture.
 
The School for Advanced Research (SAR) is pleased to share exciting new developments on one of North America’s most influential archeological sites in the next Creative Thought Forum lecture.

Committee On Arms Control & International Security Presents Talk By LANL Senior Fellow Terry Hawkins

on December 4, 2018 - 7:10am
 

LACACIS News:

The Los Alamos Committee on Arms Control and International Security (LACACIS) will hold its annual meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 5, in the lounge of The United Church of Los Alamos at 2525 Canyon Road.  

A brief business meeting will be followed by a presentation by LANL Senior Fellow Houston T. (Terry) Hawkins. The presentation is entitled “The Art and Science of Surviving What We Are Becoming.” Hawkins grounds his presentation in the field of socially coupled systems and informatics (SCSI), which deals with the social aspects of computerization.

Unique STEM Opportunities At LAMS

on December 3, 2018 - 11:21am
By Mr. T.J. BONZON
LAMS Computer Science Teacher
 
We are thankful for the recent support from LAPS Foundation and our local Rotary Club who have awarded us separate grants for our Robotic Blimps and Hoverboard Repair projects.
 
LAPS Foundation awarded us $825 for two robotic blimps, and the Rotary Club awarded us $500 for replacement parts and for a LAMS hoverboard.
 
My pre-engineering/robotics student Nick Sawyer attended the initial Rotary Club luncheon two weeks ago to present the hoverboard repair project for their consideration.

NIST: New Device Widens Light Beams By 400 Times

on December 2, 2018 - 7:24am
This mode expansion device is made of a linear waveguide, a slab waveguide, and a grating. Light enters the device through the linear waveguide. When the waveguide makes contact with the slab, the light expands laterally. The grating then converts the expanded light into waves through free-space. The process also can happen in reverse, bringing free-space light into the waveguide. This enables researchers to connect two mode expansion devices together. For instance, they can use two devices to prove an unknown gas. By Sean Kelley/NIST
 
NIST News:
 
By using light waves instead of electric

NIST: Atomic Clocks Now Keep Time Well Enough To Improve Models Of Earth

on November 30, 2018 - 9:36am
NIST physicist Andrew Ludlow and colleagues achieved new atomic clock performance records in a comparison of two ytterbium optical lattice clocks. Laser systems used in both clocks are visible in the foreground, and the main apparatus for one of the clocks is located behind Ludlow. Courtesy/Burrus/NIST
 
NIST News:
 
Experimental atomic clocks at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have achieved three new performance records, now ticking precisely enough to not only improve timekeeping and navigation, but also detect faint signals from gravity, the early universe and

AGU: Whale Songs’ Changing Pitch May Be Response To Population, Climate Changes

on November 30, 2018 - 9:27am
A fin whale surfaces at 58˚S in the southern Indian Ocean in a photo captured in January 2010 from the R/V Marion Dufresne, the research vessel that collected hydrophone data for the new study. Courtesy/J-Y Royer
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Blue whales around the world are singing a little flat, and scientists may now have more clues as to the reason why.
 
A new study finds there’s a seasonal variation in the whales’ pitch correlated with breaking sea ice in the southern Indian Ocean.

PEEC: Explore The Sun With Joyce Guzik Friday

on November 29, 2018 - 8:27am
Joyce Guzik will present the talk ‘Inside the Sun’ at 7 p.m. Friday at the nature center. Courtesy/PEEC
 
PEEC News:
 
Learn about a local star Friday, Nov. 30 at the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium at a presentation from Joyce Guzik called “Inside the Sun.”
 
Guzik’s presentation begins at 7 p.m. and explores why the sun shines, the possible fate of the sun and earth and much more. She guarantees that the audience will learn something about the sun that they didn’t know before.
 
In her talk, Guzik will discuss what generates energy inside the sun, how the sun was formed, what

Three LANL Scientists Named Fellows By AAAS

on November 28, 2018 - 1:18pm

Los Alamos newest AAAS Fellows from left, Manvendra Dubey, David Janecky and Greg Swift. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Manvendra Dubey, David Janecky and Greg Swift honored for their lasting impacts in climate, oceanic and thermoacoustic science

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists Manvendra Dubey, David Janecky and Greg Swift have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a Fellow of AAAS is an honor bestowed upon Association members by their peers.

“Becoming an AAAS fellow is a tremendous honor.

LANL: Innate Fingerprint Could Detect Tampered Steel

on November 28, 2018 - 11:34am

David Mascarenas, a research and development engineer at LANL, used Barkhausen noise to find unique-looking ‘fingerprints’ in steel that could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Treaty compliance aided by spotting illicit artillery exchange and duplication

Researchers using magnetic signals have found unique “fingerprints” on steel, which could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry.

 

“Magnetic signals provide a wide range of possible

UbiQD Of Los Alamos Launches Quantum Dot Greenhouse Film Product

on November 27, 2018 - 4:05pm

UbiQD launched its retrofit greenhouse film product called UbiGro on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. Courtesy/UbiQD, Inc.

Greenhouse Technology Engineer Damon Hebert checks on a tomato study grown under UbiGro films at the New Mexico Consortium (NMC) greenhouse in Los Alamos. Courtesy/UbiQD, Inc.

UbiQD News:

  • The company has garnered EPA approval to manufacture its first commercial product, a luminescent film called UbiGro that improves crop quality and yield

UbiQD, Inc., a Los Alamos-based nanotechnology development company, announced today that it has launched its first commercial quantum dot

AGU: Oil Extraction Likely Triggered Mid-Century Earthquakes In Los Angeles

on November 23, 2018 - 10:27am

Oil fueled the growth of Los Angeles from 50,000 people in 1890 to 1.5 million in 1940. By the 1940s, the Signal Hill field alone had a forest of 20,000 derricks among its residential homes. Los Angeles County still has 3,000 active wells. Signal Hill postcard c. 1926 Courtesy/Werner Von Boltenstern Postcard Collection, Loyola Marymount University library archive

AGU News:

  • New study revisits data, eyewitness accounts from the early instrumentation age

 
By LIZA LESTER
AGU

World War II-era oil pumping under Los Angeles likely triggered a rash of mid-sized earthquakes in the 1930s and

Learn About Asteroids And Watch ‘National Parks Adventure’ In Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium

on November 22, 2018 - 7:34am

Join astronomer Rick Wallace at 7 p.m., Friday at the nature center planetarium to learn about the past and future of asteroid impacts. Courtesy/PEEC

Watch the full-dome film ‘National Parks Adventure’ at 2 p.m. Saturday at the nature center. Courtesy/PEEC

PEEC News:

Join astronomer Rick Wallace in the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium this Friday, Nov. 23 at 7 p.m. to learn all about the past and future of asteroid impacts and threats.

Audience members will watch the full-dome film “Incoming!” at this event and enjoy an audio-visual presentation from Wallace on the nature of

Researchers Discover How ‘Cryptic’ Connections In Disease Transmission Influence Epidemics

on November 21, 2018 - 3:13pm
Researchers Kate Langwig, Joseph Hoyt and Jennifer Redell tag bats with fluorescent dust and observed their movements to track hidden connections that can spread disease within and between bat species. Courtesy/Virginia Tech
 
VIRGINIA TECH News:
 
Diseases have repeatedly spilled over from wildlife to humans, causing local to global epidemics, such as HIV/AIDS, Ebola, SARS and Nipah.
 
A new study by researchers of disease transmission in bats has broad implications for understanding hidden or “Cryptic” connections that can spread diseases between species and lead to large-scale

LANL: Eight Los Alamos Projects Win R&D 100 Awards

on November 20, 2018 - 8:16am

Eight LANL projects win R&D 100 Awards at R&D Magazine’s annual ceremony. Courtesy photo
 
LANL News:
 
Eight Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies win R&D 100 Awards at R&D Magazine’s annual ceremony in Orlando, Fla. Three of the inventions also win Special Recognition Awards, including a Gold award for corporate social responsibility.
 
“The Laboratory’s eight R&D 100 award winners show how scientific excellence in the name of national security can also benefit society as a whole,” Laboratory Director Thom Mason said.

AGU: Winter Temperatures Linked To Increased Crime

on November 17, 2018 - 9:54am
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Milder winter weather increased regional crime rates in the United States over the past several decades, according to new research that suggests crime is related to temperature’s effect on daily activities.
 
A new study published in GeoHealth, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, finds U.S. crime rates are linked to warmer temperatures, and this relationship follows a seasonal pattern.
 
The findings support the theory that three major ingredients come together to bring about crime: a motivated offender, a suitable target, and the absence of a

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