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Home Country: Should Have Been Diamond Cutters

on September 18, 2018 - 7:13am
Home Country
Slim Randles
 
You have to look for the schism, Jasper said to himself out at the woodpile. He put another chunk of firewood up on the splitting block and took a look at the checking cracks that ran part way through the circles of age rings.
 
If I hit it right there, he said to himself, it should cleave.
 
"What do you think, Arthur? If I hit it right there...?"
 
Arthur looked up from his end of the woodpile and wagged his tail. The old guy's talking to me again. Sure is cold out here. When are we going back in the cabin? Isn't it almost time for supper?

Birnbaum: Response To Gessing Op-Ed

on September 17, 2018 - 3:54pm
By EDWARD BIRNBAUM
Los Alamos

The revenues accruing from oil and gas this year are anticipated to generate a large budget surplus in excess of 1 billion dollars for New Mexico in the next fiscal year, a situation which is predicted to continue for at least the next several years. Many folks have already commented on how this surplus should be spent, as did Paul Gessing in his Los Alamos Daily Post op-ed (Sept. 12, 2018), in which the focus is on pension and tax reform.

Tax reform has been a hotly debated topic at the Roundhouse for many years, and our dependence on the GRT is a problem,

How The Hen House Turns: Mental Activity In Animals

on September 17, 2018 - 12:44pm
Courtesy photo
 
By CARY NEEPER
Formerly of Los Alamos
 
An Ethogram is a chart that lists the kind of mental activity observed in animals: Tool using? Reflection? Problem solving? Flexible decision-making? Thinking? In his Great Course, “Zoology: Understanding the Animal World,” Donald E. Moore III explores some interesting suggestions.
 
Do animals use tools? That is no longer in question for some, especially the untrained crows that choose appropriate visible tools to reach other tools of more appropriate size that allows them to reach visible treats deep in a plastic box.

Fr. Glenn: No, It’s Not Time...

on September 16, 2018 - 5:54am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

I’m hoping not to weary the reader by ceaseless pondering on the problems and issues experienced by the Catholic Church recently, but there was an editorial in the Santa Fe New Mexican the other day, which really required some response. Many of you may have seen that editorial, and it is my hope that the response submitted will clarify some of the teaching/positions of the Catholic faith if nothing else. But … as I have no idea whether the SFNM will actually publish that submission, it is offered to you below.

World Futures: Governance Part 2

on September 14, 2018 - 2:43am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
In the previous column we ended by observing a roughly pyramidal order in every organization. Yet in my mental model I visualize the 7.4 billion people on Earth as individual bubbles engaged in pedesis or Brownian motion.
 
First observed, or at least documented, by botanist Robert Brown in 1827, he observed that the triangular shaped pollen of Clarkia Pulchella immersed in water would burst at the corners. The particles released would then randomly bounce around in the water.

In a bubble model of humanity assume every person is a

Keeping High Quality Teachers In The Classroom

on September 13, 2018 - 9:41am
By SHELBI SIMEONE-MONTOYA
Teach Plus New Mexico Teaching Policy Fellow
 
It was a hard conversation to have with my 8th grade students in February about how they would feel if I wasn’t their teacher the rest of the year. Our discussion was one I posed as hypothetical as I contemplated leaving my school of four years, the only school I’d known, to an administrative intern position.
 
“If you leave, I don’t know what I’ll do!”, was a quote from one of the students in my room during our weekly lunch advisory sessions.This was one of the 10 students in my homeroom class whose rapport with

Sara Scott: Let's Chat

on September 13, 2018 - 9:16am
By SARA SCOTT
Democratic Candidate
Los Alamos County Council

One of the best parts of running for public office is the opportunity to speak with so many folks in the community – through knocking on doors, participating in meetings of community organizations, meeting with county staff and attending local events.

I really enjoy getting to chat with both new and familiar faces. I’ve heard about a wide variety of issues important to many in the community including:

  • Identifying how to increase the amount and types of housing options.
  • Supporting our school system and the University of New

Weekly Fishing Report: Sept. 13

on September 13, 2018 - 7:53am
By GEORGE MORSE
Sports Editor
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
The hotspot for trout this week appears to be the Canjilon Lakes once again. Once they opened back up to anglers Aug. 22 after being closed for several years, the lakes have been experiencing heavy fishing pressure. Anglers that I have spoken to tell of difficulty in finding a place to park and anglers lining the banks shoulder-to-shoulder.
 
The State Game and Fish Department has stocked thousands of fish here and last week was no exception. The Department stocked 2,192 catchable-size rainbow trout Sept.

Benson: Every Day Is 9-11...

on September 12, 2018 - 9:50am
By JODY BENSON
Los Alamos

Tuesday morning, a monumental American flag soared from the high-angle rescue ladder above the row of fire engines and emergency vehicles parked ceremonially at the West Jemez Road Fire Station. Tuesday was 9-11, something Americans alive in 2001 were tasked to Never Forget.

As I watched people heading into LANL, however, it seemed as if … well … a lot of us have, indeed, forgotten. Drivers were concentrating on mundane things like the phone at their ear, or the car ahead rather than the flag above.

Gessing: What To Do With That $1.2 Billion Surplus?

on September 12, 2018 - 6:56am
By PAUL J. GESSING
Rio Grande Foundation
 
The announcement that New Mexico’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year is now $1.2 billion in surplus is welcome news. After a decade of fiscal and economic challenges, there are signs of life in the Land of Enchantment.
 
Nonetheless, serious public-policy issues persist in our state and the wealth generated by booming oil production in the Permian Basin should not be a license for policymakers to avoid much-needed reforms.

Home Country: Doctors Office

on September 10, 2018 - 11:28am
Home Country
By SLIM RANDLES

“That you, Doc?”

“Sure is. How you doing, Windy?”

“Finer’n frog hair, Doc. Say, did you hear about ol’ Bob over at the junction?”

“Sure was a shame, Windy. I had no idea he was sick. Went pretty fast is what I heard.”

“Me, too. Say Doc, you remember Minnie up at the capitol? I heard she passed just last week.”

“You don’t say. That’s a shame. Used to see her at dances at the Legion. So how are you, Windy?”

“Oh, I’m okay, I guess. Them pills you gave me seem to be helpin’ with the arthur-itis and the lombardo of the back. How ‘bout you, Doc? Eatin’ good?

Tags: 

Fr. Glenn: Shining The Light

on September 9, 2018 - 8:55am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

You may have seen the stories in the state and national news this week of several states’ attorneys general in the U.S.—including ours in New Mexico—subpoenaing Catholic dioceses’ for all material pertaining to child abuse by clergy and staff. I’ve often wondered why such hasn’t been done long before now, and can’t deny that I’m glad to see it come about if it effects more assurance in the public. Not that I expect much, if any, new revelations in the Santa Fe Archdiocese; hopefully not in others, either. 

But such

Smart Design By Suzette: Lighting Tips for Every Room Part Two

on September 7, 2018 - 10:42am
Bedside and closet lighting are key in bedrooms. Courtesy image
 
Use ceiling mounted or recessed fixture or wall sconce in entryways. Courtesy image
 
By SUZETTE FOX
Los Alamos
 
Hope you enjoyed Part One of Lighting Tips for Every Room which included the definition of lumens, living rooms, kitchens, dining rooms and bathrooms. If you missed it, visit my website to read up on it.
 
I will reiterate that no matter the size of a space, how you light it can make all the difference in its function.

Liddie’s Traditional New Mexican Dishes: Chile Rellenos

on September 6, 2018 - 4:15pm
Chile Rellenos. By Liddie Martinez
 
By LIDDIE MARTINEZ
Espanola Valley
 
Something magical happens in New Mexico when Labor Day nears. People slow down their hectic pace to enjoy a life transformed.
 
When the Sangre de Cristo Mountains sport swaying golden headdresses sweeping across turquoise skies and our lungs fill with the intoxicating scent of roasting green chile- we are altered.

Head2Head: Push-Me-Pull-You

on September 6, 2018 - 4:13pm
By BONNIE J. GORDON
Los Alamos Daily Post

In columns one and two, we were having a discussion with “Uncle Steve” who represents anyone we disagree with on an important issue. We listened to him and then we took our turn explaining our point of view.

But one minute into our turn, Uncle Steve is already interrupting. Expect pushback when you express your point of view. Here are some tips to avoid falling over:

  • If you get interrupted before you can explain your stance, try telling Uncle Steve, “I think where I’m coming from will be clearer, if I explain it more.

This Week At The Reel Deal

on September 6, 2018 - 4:01pm

 

Ryti: Economic Development

on September 6, 2018 - 7:38am
By RANDALL RYTI
Democratic Candidate
Los Alamos County Council

I moved to Los Alamos in 1992 as a founding partner in a small environmental consulting business, Neptune and Company. For this reason I have always followed Los Alamos County’s efforts to foster economic development and diversification. I was also on the board of the Pajarito Environmental Education Center as we moved from a fledgling 501c3 entity to a non-profit business providing educational services to the community.

Every entrepreneur has his or her own reasons for starting a business.

Weekly Fishing Report Sept. 5

on September 5, 2018 - 5:33am
By GEORGE MORSE
Sports Editor
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
The nights and early mornings are getting cooler now and fall is just around the corner. The cooler temperatures and shorter days will help make the trout a little more active.
 
Fall-spawning trout species like brown trout and brook trout will start to be more active and begin to develop their fall colors prior to spawning. It won’t be too long that the leaves on the aspen trees start to turn a beautiful gold and the mountains are ablaze with color.
 
The bow hunting season for elk started Sept.

Amateur Naturalist: Aspen, Icon Of The Mountains

on September 4, 2018 - 6:13am
The autumn leaves have fallen in one grove. Photo Robert Dryja
 
The leaves still remain in another grove a short distance away. Photo Robert Dryja
 
By ROBERT DRYJA
Amateur Naturalist
 
All the leaves in a grove of aspen trees change color at the same time in the autumn. This is a result of all of the trees being part of the same clone. Aspen tree roots extend throughout an area, sending individual tree stems upward.
 
The trees appear to be separate when seen above ground but are interconnected below ground. The trees are called ramets.

AFT President Weingarten: My Labor Day Message

on September 3, 2018 - 12:41pm
By RANDI WEINGARTEN, president
American Federation of Teachers

A growing and enduring middle class, great public schools, a living wage, affordable healthcare and college, a decent retirement, a voice at work and in our democracy, communities that are safe and welcoming—these are American aspirations, and they are what the American labor movement has fought for, for generations.

We have fought to ensure these aspirations are attainable for everyone, no matter your ZIP code, race, religion, ethnicity, sex or gender identity.

That’s who we are as a labor movement and as the American Federation

Armbruster: The Meaning Of Labor Day

on September 3, 2018 - 11:59am
By KARYL ANN ARMBRUSTER
Union member since 1970, negotiating team member 1995-2009
LAFSE president 2002-2008, LAMS teacher 17 years 

Labor Day is not just a day off. It represents the lives hundreds of workers put on the line to make America great.

Our Los Alamos Federation of School Employees (LAFSE), a part of AFL-CIO has helped make working conditions in Los Alamos Public Schools where more than 60 percent of teachers belong even better.

LAFSE is responsible for leave days, the sick leave bank, for speech and language therapists, nurses and counselors earning the same pay as teachers

Partridge: Cancer Treatment Huge Expense

on September 3, 2018 - 6:48am

Nancy Patridge participating in this year's Relay for Life. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com

By NANCY PARTRIDGE
Los Alamos

One event down, two to go.

The recent Relay for Life event in Los Alamos on the Canyon Rim Trail. I walked 18 miles and tried out my new wings and some gear for the big walk in September.

In a few weeks I’ll walk the 60-mile, three-day Susan G. Komen event in Seattle. And three weeks after that will be the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk in Santa Fe.

It’s been a long training season, 24 weeks of walking.

Fr. Glenn: The Critter Superhighway

on September 2, 2018 - 7:10am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

As many of you know, it can be quite the mini-adventure living next to one of the canyons here in Los Alamos. Not only do we have the beauty of the pines, the oaks, the geology, the pleasing contours of the land, but we also are treated to a panoply of wildlife traipsing even through our yards.

Over at IHM I’ve seen all sorts of wildlife in my five years here—raccoons, bears, foxes, Pokemoners (just kidding! ... but they DO seem to be most prevalent. When’s huntin’ season for them things up here, anyway?

World Futures: Statistics (And Probability) – Part 10

on September 2, 2018 - 6:04am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
In the previous columns we explored different areas where statistics are used for scientific purposes, management purposes. operational decisions and intellectual purposes. For example, measuring the cross sections of a Uranium atom (a statistical measurement) allows for the design of a nuclear reactor.

But how do you measure what people want both individually and collectively? As a collection of individuals we want and need things, the driving desires that support consumption, purchasing and demand for business enterprises.

McQuiston: Sharing Economy ... New Opportunities Create Insurance Challenges

on September 1, 2018 - 7:40pm

By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency

The “sharing economy” continues to provide individuals and families with non-traditional ways to rent vacation properties, hitch a ride via a ridesharing service, and even rent vehicles for short-term use.

By now most of you are probably somewhat familiar with companies such as VRBO, Airbnb, Uber and Lyft. However, if you aren’t, these companies allow individuals to conduct business on a peer-to-peer level, taking the place of traditional property management, taxi, and rental car services.

I recently took a call from a personal insurance client of mine

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