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Trump says N.Korea went too far in calling Biden 'rabid dog'

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 9:27am

US President Donald Trump issued a rare -- if tepid -- defense of election rival Joe Biden on Sunday, saying Pyongyang's depiction of him as "a rabid dog" who should be "beaten to death" went a bit too far. The president was responding to a conservative commentator's tweet about a particularly visceral attack on Biden issued Friday by North Korea. The North's official KCNA news agency said Biden had shown "the temerity to dare slander the dignity of the supreme leadership" of North Korea.


Trump sort of defends Joe Biden from North Korean media attacks

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 9:15am

President Trump is usually the one hurling insults at former Vice President Joe Biden, but on Sunday he actually defended his potential general election opponent -- at least somewhat.Earlier this week, North Korean state media described Biden as a "rabid dog" who should be "beaten to death with a stick." Trump was late to the news, but when he caught wind of it Sunday morning, it proved to be too much even for him. Trump's defense of Biden wasn't exactly ardent or inspiring, but it's reassuring to learn that he doesn't agree with Pyongyang on this one, despite his normally negative feelings about Biden.> Mr. Chairman, Joe Biden may be Sleepy and Very Slow, but he is not a "rabid dog." He is actually somewhat better than that, but I am the only one who can get you where you have to be. You should act quickly, get the deal done. See you soon! https://t.co/kO2k14lTf7> > -- Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 17, 2019Still, the president made sure everyone knows he still doesn't think highly of Biden. He also got a word in there about how he alone is capable of solving the U.S.-North Korea stalemate, implying that if North Korea waits around for a Democratic candidate like Biden to get elected, there will never be a satisfactory deal.More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird?


RPT-UPDATE 3-Iran's Khamenei backs gasoline price hike, blames 'sabotage' for unrest

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 8:53am

Iran's Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Sunday backed the sharp gasoline price rises that have sparked country-wide protests, which he blamed on the Islamic Republic's opponents and "sabotage" by foreign foes. "Some people are no doubt worried by this decision ... but sabotage and arson is done by hooligans not our people," the Iranian Supreme Leader said in a live speech on state TV.


Trump Tells North Korea’s Kim That Biden Isn’t a ‘Rabid Dog’

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 8:50am

(Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump addressed Kim Jong Un on Twitter, saying that Democrat Joe Biden isn’t a “rabid dog” as recently dubbed by state media in Pyongyang, but urging North Korea to “act quickly” to sign a nuclear deal with the U.S.Trump’s tweet on Sunday came hours after North Korea ruled out any denuclearization talks with the U.S. unless Washington lifts what were termed “hostile policies” against the regime, according to the state-run Korean Central News Agency.KCNA last week said of Biden, the former vice president, that he “must be beaten to death with a stick, before it is too late.”“Joe Biden may be Sleepy and Very Slow, but he is not a ‘rabid dog,”’ Trump said Sunday in a tweet to Kim. He concluded, “See you soon!” There are currently no announced plans for a meeting between the two leaders, who’ve met three times since June 2018.Pyongyang last week blamed U.S.-South Korean military drills “as a main factor of screwing up tensions” and reminded Washington that leader Kim has given the U.S. a year-end deadline to reduce sanctions or “face a greater threat.”On Sunday, U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said in Bangkok that Washington and Seoul “have jointly decided to postpone this month’s combined flying training event” after “close consultation and careful consideration.”Read more: Trump Price Tag for Troops in South Korea Clouds Esper TripTo contact the reporter on this story: Ros Krasny in Washington at rkrasny1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, Tony Czuczka, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


UN warns Bolivia crisis could ‘spin out of control’ after nine killed in latest violence

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 8:49am

The United Nations has warned mounting unrest in Bolivia could “spin out of control” after nine people died in the latest escalation of violence between between security forces and supporters of former president Evo Morales.Protesters loyal to Mr Morales, who resigned from office and fled to Mexico after being accused of electoral fraud, were fired upon by armed police on Friday after attempting to cross a military checkpoint in the central city of Sacaba.


Fires rage around besieged Hong Kong campus as protesters dig-in

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 8:20am

A police officer was struck by an arrow fired by a Hong Kong protester on Sunday and an armoured vehicle set ablaze, as fires raged into the night around a campus which has turned into a base for a pro-democracy movement that has sunk the city into turmoil. Protests have tremored through the global financial hub since June with many in the city of 7.5 million people venting fury at eroding freedoms under Chinese rule. Chinese President Xi Jinping this week issued his most strident comments on the crisis, saying it threatened the "one country, two systems" model under which Hong Kong has been ruled since the 1997 handover from Britain.


Egypt officials: 3 security forces killed in Sinai blast

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 7:54am

EL-ARISH, Egypt (AP) — A roadside bomb killed at least three members of Egypt’s security forces in the restive northern Sinai province, security and medical officials said Sunday. The explosion hit the forces’ armored vehicle in the town of Sheikh Zuweid. Four other security force members were wounded, including an officer.


Private zoo owner in Crimea pleads for public to take 30 of his bears so he won't have to euthanise them

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 7:15am

The owner of a struggling safari park in Crimea is giving more than thirty bears to save them from euthanasia.  Oleg Zubkov, the owner of the Taigan Lion Park near Simferopol, said he is seeking new homes for the animals because he can no longer afford to feed them. It comes after inspectors ordered the safari park, which is famous for its large collection of lions, found violations of veterinary regulations and ordered it closed for three months.  Speaking on his Youtube channel, “the Lion Man,” Mr Zubkov said he could not afford to feed and look after the animals without the revenue from ticket sales and was left with no choice but to find them new homes or put them down.  “Twelve lions and tigers will be moved to other zoos shortly, and a final decision will be made about… shooting 30 bears from the park,” he says in the video. “I’ve forced into these extreme measures because there are no other options left,” he said. Oleg Zubkov with BBC television presenter  Simon Reeve Credit:  Jonathan Young Mr Zubkov said he had already fed several dozen of his Vietnamese pigs to the lions and tigers in a bid to cut costs, and that he had informed regional veterinary authorities about his decision to cull his bears.  Valery Ivanov, the head of the state veterinary committee in Crimea, told Interfax no documents related to the killing of animals had been received.  The Taigan Safari Park, which is home to 2,500 animals, was opened in 2012. Mr Zubkov also runs a second zoo, called Skazka, in Yalta.  Both have been the subject of numerous complaints about the conditions in which the animals are kept, according to local officials.  Last year Taigan was at the centre of a small scandal after one of the lions bit a 46 year old female tourist posing for photographs with the animal.  Mr Zubkov's career has not passed without controversy Credit: Media Drum World / Alamy Stock Photo Mr Zubkov insists that his bears live in better conditions than in many other zoos in Russia, and that the biting incident was the only one of its kind. He has complained that authorities have been trying to shut him down ever since Russia annexed the Black Sea peninsular after Vladimir Putin annexed it from Ukraine in 2014.  Mr Zubkov was an enthusiastic supporter the annexation at the time, and even featured in Russian television reports promising that his “fighting lions” would maintain order during the controversial referendum on “reunification” with Russia.  In the months afterwards he made an unsuccessful bid to enter local politics and even tried to call Vladimir Putin during his annual phone-in show to invite him to the safari park.   But by 2015 he had begun to complain that he and his zoo had become the target of a campaign of harassment by local officials apparently determined to put him out of business.


Russia providing mood music for House impeachment drama

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 7:10am

As has so often been the case since President Donald Trump took office, Moscow provides the mood music for the unfolding political drama. “With you, Mr. President, all roads lead to Putin,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi declared last week, and not for the first time. The impeachment investigation is centered on allegations that Trump tried to pressure Ukraine’s new leader over the summer to dig up dirt on Trump political rival Joe Biden, holding up U.S. military aid to the Eastern European nation as leverage.


Lebanon’s outgoing PM blasts president’s party over delays

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 6:53am

Lebanon’s outgoing prime minister is harshly criticizing the party of the country’s president after weeks of delay in forming a new Cabinet. Almost three weeks after Hariri resigned amid massive anti-government protests, Aoun has yet to call for consultations with parliamentary blocs’ leaders to name a new premier. Some major factions in Lebanon’s sectarian political system want to keep Hariri in the new government.


Arcuri Says Boris Johnson Cast Her Aside Like ‘Some Gremlin’

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 6:36am

(Bloomberg) -- Jennifer Arcuri, who is at the center of a controversy over her ties to Boris Johnson, said the U.K. Prime Minister cast her aside “like I am some gremlin” once the media began probing their relationship and public funds given to her company.“I don’t understand why you’ve blocked me and ignored me as if I was some fleeting one-night stand or some girl that you picked up at a bar because I wasn’t -- and you know that,” Arcuri said in comments directed at Johnson, and which will be broadcast in an interview on ITV’s Exposure on Sunday. “I’m terribly heartbroken by the way that you have cast me aside like I am some gremlin.”Controversy surrounding Arcuri has threatened to blight Johnson’s Dec. 12 election campaign, as he seeks a parliamentary majority to push through his Brexit withdrawal agreement. The Independent Office for Police Conduct agency is reviewing whether to open a criminal investigation into Johnson’s links with the U.S. technology entrepreneur.READ MORE: The Unsettled Life of Boris Johnson Pal Jennifer ArcuriArcuri refused to discuss the exact nature of her and Johnson’s relationship, which lasted more than four years, according to the TV program. Johnson, who was mayor of London in 2008 to 2016, has similarly refused to elaborate on it. Both have denied any wrongdoing.“Any claims of impropriety in office are untrue and unfounded,” a Conservative Party spokesperson told the ITV program.Johnson didn’t mention Arcuri in any of nine letters declaring personal interests he wrote to a City Hall monitoring officer during the time of the relationship, the program said.Johnson’s attendance at events organized by Arcuri’s company Innotech boosted her business profile, the show said. She also acknowledged that her cyber-security business Hacker House benefited from joining a mayoral trade mission to Tel Aviv in November 2015.To contact the reporter on this story: Antonio Vanuzzo in London at avanuzzo@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Andrew Davis at abdavis@bloomberg.net, Neil DenslowFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Lebanese Tycoon Pulls Candidacy for Premier as S&P Raises Alarm

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 6:26am

(Bloomberg) -- The withdrawal of a candidate to become Lebanon’s prime minister is once again threatening to drag out the process at a time the country faces calls to take urgent steps necessary to avoid economic collapse.Mohammed Safadi, a wealthy Lebanese businessman and former finance minister, put an end to his bid just two days after winning the backing of Lebanon’s major political parties. Lebanon has been without a government since Saad Hariri resigned late last month in the face of protests over mismanagement that’s pushed the economy to the verge of bankruptcy.“The risk of a protracted political vacuum increases policy uncertainty,” S&P Global Ratings said on Friday as it downgraded Lebanon deeper into junk. Warning over “the likelihood that a new government may seek to restructure its debt,” S&P said “the fragmented and confession-based political power-sharing system in Lebanon could delay a political solution.”Safadi’s candidacy already faced opposition by anti-government protesters pressing for deeper reform. Three former prime ministers also came out against his nomination and called for Hariri to be reappointed. President Michel Aoun has yet to set a date for parliamentary consultations to name a new premier.Local media reported that Hariri, Aoun, as well as the Iran-backed Hezbollah group and allies, have all agreed to name Safadi, a former lawmaker who’s also been a member in various governments for over a decade, to head the next cabinet.‘Difficult to Form’Instead, in a statement carried by the state-run National News Agency, Safadi, 75, said he realized “it will be difficult to form a harmonious government supported by all political sides that would enable it to take immediate rescue measures to stop the economic and financial deterioration and meet the aspirations of the people on the streets.”The political logjam is leaving Lebanon with few options as it confronts one of the most serious crises in decades. Banks are closed, trade is stymied by a shortage of foreign currency and the pound has depreciated on the black market as concerns rise that the country is heading toward a debt crisis.The squabbling has also stalled economic reform plans required to win back investor confidence and unlock some $11 billion in international aid pledged at a donor conference last year.More protests are planned in Lebanon on Sunday. Demonstrators are calling for a government of experts that’s able to steer Lebanon through a financial crisis that has put pressure on its decades-old currency peg.In response, local lenders have tightened restrictions on the movement of capital by banning transfers abroad and setting limits on withdrawals to avoid a run on the banks.Police promised to boost patrols and security near banks after their employees union decided to go on strike until management provides them with needed protection against angry customers.S&P’s WarningsMeanwhile, S&P’s downgrade of Lebanon by two notches to CCC sets out the challenges facing the economy. The entire financial model that’s kept it afloat is unraveling as bank deposits from diaspora investors dwindle. S&P warned that it expects deposit outflow to accelerate in the rest of 2019, despite the restrictions imposed by banks.Even as the central bank will likely “prioritize government debt repayments over other obligations,” a restructuring can no longer be ruled out, according to S&P.“The recent imposition of restrictions on foreign-currency deposit withdrawals by banks raises questions about the monetary and banking regime,” it said. “Moreover, it will probably increase the likelihood of the imposition of official capital controls and, in a severe scenario, a possible end of the currency peg to the U.S. dollar.”To contact the reporters on this story: Nadeem Hamid in Washington at nhamid3@bloomberg.net;Dana Khraiche in Beirut at dkhraiche@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, Paul Abelsky, Amy TeibelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Iran leader backs petrol price hike that sparked deadly unrest

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 6:03am

Iran's supreme leader on Sunday threw his support behind a decision to hike petrol prices, a move that sparked nationwide unrest in which he said "some lost their lives". Ayatollah Ali Khamenei blamed "hooligans" for damaging property and said "all the centres of the world's wickedness against us have cheered" the street protests. A policeman was killed in the western city of Kermanhshah in a clash with armed "rioters", the second confirmed death since protests erupted across Iran on Friday.


U.S. postpones military exercises with South Korea in nod toward North Korea

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 5:40am

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Sunday the United States and South Korea have indefinitely postponed a joint military exercise in an “act of goodwill” toward North Korea. The move comes even as Japan’s defense minister, whose country feels threatened by repeated North Korean missile launches, told Esper “no one could be optimistic about” changing the North’s behavior. The statement by Japan’s defense chief, Taro Kono, was a stark illustration of the difficulties facing the U.S. and its international allies and partners as they struggle to get North Korea back to negotiations to eliminate its nuclear weapons and missiles.


Iran shuts down country's internet in the wake of fuel protests

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 4:58am

Iran, one of the countries most strongly identified with the rise cyber terrorism and malicious hacking, appears now to be using an iron fist to turn on its own. The country has reportedly shut down nearly all internet access in the country in retaliation to escalating protests that were originally ignited by a rise in fuel prices, according to readings taken by NetBlocks, an NGO that monitors cybersecurity and internet governance around the world. The last reports of outages came from yesterday (Saturday) evening, so we have contacted NetBlocks to get a more updated picture.


Trump's secret sauce

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 4:55am

Even as the country is poised to debate whether President Trump deserves a second term -- or should be allowed to complete his first one -- Republicans still haven't settled on why he won in 2016. Is it because he staked out a set of positions on immigration, trade, and foreign policy that set him apart from the rest of the field? Or was it because the rich and famous New Yorker was himself larger than life (or at least the other presidential candidates)?One test case is Jeff Sessions, the Republican who is running for his old Senate seat in Alabama. The former attorney general was into "Trumpism" -- that is, a more populist and nationalist twist on conservatism -- before Trump. As a senator, Sessions championed an immigration policy of tougher enforcement and reduced legal entries, favored making national sovereignty a bigger consideration in international trade deals, and talked about transforming the GOP into a workers party. He asked cheerfully, "How many votes does the Chamber of Commerce have?"Yet Sessions' tenure as attorney general didn't come to an end because of his failure or unwillingness to try to implement this agenda. "This is the Trump era," he warned those expecting leniency in enforcing immigration laws. It was his perceived lack of loyalty to Trump personally, particularly his recusal in the Russia investigation, which paved the way to Robert Mueller's appointment as special counsel, that made his stay at the Justice Department short-lived.It's a lesson Sessions seems to have learned, if an early campaign video is any indication. "When I left President Trump's Cabinet, did I write a tell-all book? No. Did I go on CNN and attack the president? Nope. Have I said a cross word about our president?" Sessions asked his constituents. "Not one time.""The president is doing a great job for America and Alabama, and he has my strong support," Sessions concluded. And while the feeling may not be mutual, it's not a minority opinion in the Yellowhammer State. Trump received an enthusiastic welcome in Tuscaloosa last weekend at the Alabama-LSU football game. He carried the state by 28 points the last time around and would be a heavy favorite in 2020.Consider another high-profile veteran of the Trump administration who is clearly weighing her political future. Former United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley is not a carbon copy of Trump on immigration or trade. She is particularly opposed to a less interventionist foreign policy. Haley supported Marco Rubio at the peak of his dalliances with Never Trump and expressed not too thinly veiled criticism of the future president in her 2016 Republican response to the State of the Union address.In her new book, Haley says she was not part of an effort to undermine Trump, even though then-Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and White House chief of staff John Kelly allegedly tried to recruit her. She went further in defending Trump's phone call with the Ukrainian president that sits at the heart of the House Democrats' impeachment inquiry than many sitting Republican senators would feel comfortable doing, even as they are likely to vote to prevent his removal from office.Haley is a throwback to the pre-Trump Republican Party, closer to Jeb and George W. Bush (and some of the people inside the executive branch who are also playing a key role in the impeachment inquiry) than the current occupant of the Oval Office. Sessions was a precursor to Trump and his first major Capitol Hill endorser. Haley left the administration voluntarily, Sessions was pushed out. Both now treat Trump as the deciding factor, not Trumpism the movement.This isn't to say that millions of Trump's most passionate backers would not cheer Sessions' return to the Senate while many of them would be cooler to a Haley presidential candidacy. And in 2016, GOP primary voters had many choices if they wanted either orthodox Reaganite conservatism or Bushie establishment Republicanism. They still chose Trump, who railed against two decades of bipartisan trade deals, the shaky Washington consensus that tried to foist "comprehensive immigration reform" on an unwilling conservative base, and the Iraq war.But few Trump imitators who lack his charisma, fame, or reputation for making money have fared nearly as well (though it can be argued that only now are potentially viable prospects like Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley, Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz, and even Donald Trump Jr. starting to seriously try). Before anyone can follow in Trump's footsteps, they have to decide how the president got to the White House in the first place.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird?


Yemen government delays return, officials blame separatists

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 4:03am

Yemen’s internationally recognized government was forced to delay its return to the port city of Aden, officials said Sunday, blaming southern separatists for stalling on the key point of a power-sharing deal signed early this month to end their infighting. Under the agreement brokered by Saudi Arabia between Yemeni President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi and the separatists, the government was to have returned to Aden last Tuesday.


Labour Vows Free Internet, Johnson Defends Flood Aid: U.K. Election Update

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 3:58am

(Bloomberg) -- Prince Andrew’s interview about his relationship with Jeffrey Epstein is dominating the news, but British politicians are avoiding the subject. From a political perspective the most interesting news is Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s announcement that every Conservative candidate has promised to back his Brexit deal.The Conservatives are also giving an outline of their plans for a post-Brexit immigration system, and Labour is talking about the National Health Service.For more on the U.K. election, click on ELECKey Developments:Corbyn refuses to choose a side in Brexit debateAll Tory candidates pledge to vote for Brexit dealConservatives back away from fixed immigration targetLabour signs off its election manifestoLabour promises free dental care for allCorbyn Refuses to Choose a Brexit Side (10.30 a.m.)In a BBC interview, Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn refused repeatedly to say whether he’d campaign to leave the European Union or not during the referendum he proposes for next year. He also declined to say what his party proposes as an immigration policy, though he made it clear he’s not a fan of strict controls. “There will be a great deal of movement,” he said. Corbyn’s equivocation provides room for the Conservatives to tell people what they think he’d do. The Labour leader was also ambiguous in some areas where he’s been historically forthright. Asked about Britain’s membership of NATO, Corbyn declined to say it was a good thing, but also didn’t attack it. On the U.K.’s nuclear arsenal, he restricted himself to saying that the country should be part of international negotiations to get rid of the weapons.Asked how he proposed to pay for his policies, Corbyn said multinational companies should be made to pay more tax. Johnson Should Have Declared Our Relationship: Arcuri (10.15 a.m.)Prince Andrew isn’t the only one having his relationships thrust into the spotlight this weekend. Jennifer Arcuri, the American entrepreneur caught up in a controversy involving the prime minister, has given an interview to ITV saying she wishes Boris Johnson had declared their relationship as a potential conflict of interest.While Arcuri has refused to discuss the exact nature of their relationship, she said Johnson cast her aside “like I am some gremlin” after the media began to ask questions about access and public money her company was given when he was mayor of London. Johnson has likewise refused to say what his relationship with Arcuri was, but denies any wrongdoing.“I don’t understand why you’ve blocked me and ignored me as if I was some fleeting one-night stand or some girl that you picked up at a bar because I wasn’t,” she said, in the interview to be broadcast on Sunday evening.Raab Says No-Deal Brexit is Not Remotely Likely (10 a.m.)Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab was questioned about the plan for the future trade agreement with the EU on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show. While he admitted that it will necessarily be a compromise, he said there’s an opportunity to reach a “win-win” which is “great for the U.K. but also good for our European friends.”Asked if the U.K. could leave the EU without a deal, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said, “no, it’s not what we want to do.” He clarified, “I don’t think it’s remotely likely.”Labour Promises Free Dental Care for All (9 a.m.)Labour is continuing its approach of eye-catching offers for voters. After free broadband on Friday, Sunday’s was free dental care. Health spokesman Jon Ashworth told Sky News that people unable to afford to visit dentists were treating themselves using kits from budget shops.Conservatives Drop Fixed Immigration Target (8:45 a.m.)Security Minister Brandon Lewis told Sky News that after Brexit the Conservatives want to treat migrants from the European Union the same way as those from the rest of the world. He promised a five-year wait before people can claim welfare payments. But he backed away from the promise the Conservatives have been making -- and failing to keep -- for a decade, to reduce net immigration below 100,000 a year.“We’ll not set arbitrary targets,” he said. “I’m not getting into those kind of issues that we’ve had before. We will reduce immigration because when we leave the EU we will pass an immigration act that brings in a points-based system.”All Conservative Candidates Pledge to Back Brexit Deal (Overnight)If Prime Minister Boris Johnson wins a majority on Dec. 12, his chances of swiftly passing his Brexit deal are increased by his announcement that all his candidates have promised to back it. In an interview with the Sunday Telegraph, he said: “All 635 Conservative candidates standing at this election -- every single one of them -- has pledged to me that if elected they will vote in Parliament to pass my Brexit deal so we can end the uncertainty and finally leave the EU. I am offering a pact with the people: if you vote Conservative you can be 100% sure a majority Conservative government will unblock Parliament and get Brexit done.”It’s a significant pledge because the biggest obstacle to getting Brexit deals through Parliament has been the inability of Conservatives to agree about what kind of Brexit they want. But what it probably doesn’t cover is the next stage of Brexit, which is likely to revive arguments about how close the U.K. wants to be to the EU.Labour Agrees on Election Manifesto (Overnight)The opposition Labour Party signed off its policy platform for the election. It won’t be unveiled until Thursday, but some leaks include:A “Right to Food Act” introducing price controls, according to the MailA windfall tax on oil companies, according to the MailAn expansion of the sugar tax, according to the MailDropping a plan to allow private tenants to buy their homes, according to the FTEarlier:Corbyn Seeks to Use Britain’s NHS as Election BattlegroundPrince Andrew Bombs in BBC Interview, Raising More QuestionsTo contact the reporters on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.net;Lucy Meakin in London at lmeakin1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, James Amott, Sara MarleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Conservative Candidates Pledge to Back Brexit Deal: U.K. Votes

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 3:58am

(Bloomberg) -- Prince Andrew’s interview about his relationship with Jeffrey Epstein is dominating the news, but British politicians are avoiding the subject. From a political perspective the most interesting news is Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s announcement that every Conservative candidate has promised to back his Brexit deal.The Conservatives are also giving an outline of their plans for a post-Brexit immigration system, and Labour is talking about the National Health Service.For more on the U.K. election, click on ELECKey Developments:Corbyn refuses to choose a side in Brexit debateAll Tory candidates pledge to vote for Brexit dealConservatives back away from fixed immigration targetLabour signs off its election manifestoLabour promises free dental care for allCorbyn Refuses to Choose a Brexit Side (10.30 a.m.)In a BBC interview, Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn refused repeatedly to say whether he’d campaign to leave the European Union or not during the referendum he proposes for next year. He also declined to say what his party proposes as an immigration policy, though he made it clear he’s not a fan of strict controls. “There will be a great deal of movement,” he said. Corbyn’s equivocation provides room for the Conservatives to tell people what they think he’d do. The Labour leader was also ambiguous in some areas where he’s been historically forthright. Asked about Britain’s membership of NATO, Corbyn declined to say it was a good thing, but also didn’t attack it. On the U.K.’s nuclear arsenal, he restricted himself to saying that the country should be part of international negotiations to get rid of the weapons.Asked how he proposed to pay for his policies, Corbyn said multinational companies should be made to pay more tax. Johnson Should Have Declared Our Relationship: Arcuri (10.15 a.m.)Prince Andrew isn’t the only one having his relationships thrust into the spotlight this weekend. Jennifer Arcuri, the American entrepreneur caught up in a controversy involving the prime minister, has given an interview to ITV saying she wishes Boris Johnson had declared their relationship as a potential conflict of interest.While Arcuri has refused to discuss the exact nature of their relationship, she said Johnson cast her aside “like I am some gremlin” after the media began to ask questions about access and public money her company was given when he was mayor of London. Johnson has likewise refused to say what his relationship with Arcuri was, but denies any wrongdoing.“I don’t understand why you’ve blocked me and ignored me as if I was some fleeting one-night stand or some girl that you picked up at a bar because I wasn’t,” she said, in the interview to be broadcast on Sunday evening.Raab Says No-Deal Brexit is Not Remotely Likely (10 a.m.)Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab was questioned about the plan for the future trade agreement with the EU on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show. While he admitted that it will necessarily be a compromise, he said there’s an opportunity to reach a “win-win” which is “great for the U.K. but also good for our European friends.”Asked if the U.K. could leave the EU without a deal, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said, “no, it’s not what we want to do.” He clarified, “I don’t think it’s remotely likely.”Labour Promises Free Dental Care for All (9 a.m.)Labour is continuing its approach of eye-catching offers for voters. After free broadband on Friday, Sunday’s was free dental care. Health spokesman Jon Ashworth told Sky News that people unable to afford to visit dentists were treating themselves using kits from budget shops.Conservatives Drop Fixed Immigration Target (8:45 a.m.)Security Minister Brandon Lewis told Sky News that after Brexit the Conservatives want to treat migrants from the European Union the same way as those from the rest of the world. He promised a five-year wait before people can claim welfare payments. But he backed away from the promise the Conservatives have been making -- and failing to keep -- for a decade, to reduce net immigration below 100,000 a year.“We’ll not set arbitrary targets,” he said. “I’m not getting into those kind of issues that we’ve had before. We will reduce immigration because when we leave the EU we will pass an immigration act that brings in a points-based system.”All Conservative Candidates Pledge to Back Brexit Deal (Overnight)If Prime Minister Boris Johnson wins a majority on Dec. 12, his chances of swiftly passing his Brexit deal are increased by his announcement that all his candidates have promised to back it. In an interview with the Sunday Telegraph, he said: “All 635 Conservative candidates standing at this election -- every single one of them -- has pledged to me that if elected they will vote in Parliament to pass my Brexit deal so we can end the uncertainty and finally leave the EU. I am offering a pact with the people: if you vote Conservative you can be 100% sure a majority Conservative government will unblock Parliament and get Brexit done.”It’s a significant pledge because the biggest obstacle to getting Brexit deals through Parliament has been the inability of Conservatives to agree about what kind of Brexit they want. But what it probably doesn’t cover is the next stage of Brexit, which is likely to revive arguments about how close the U.K. wants to be to the EU.Labour Agrees on Election Manifesto (Overnight)The opposition Labour Party signed off its policy platform for the election. It won’t be unveiled until Thursday, but some leaks include:A “Right to Food Act” introducing price controls, according to the MailA windfall tax on oil companies, according to the MailAn expansion of the sugar tax, according to the MailDropping a plan to allow private tenants to buy their homes, according to the FTEarlier:Corbyn Seeks to Use Britain’s NHS as Election BattlegroundPrince Andrew Bombs in BBC Interview, Raising More QuestionsTo contact the reporters on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.net;Lucy Meakin in London at lmeakin1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, James Amott, Sara MarleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Conservative Candidates Pledge to Back Brexit Deal: U.K. Votes

Yahoo World News Feed - November 17, 2019 - 3:39am

(Bloomberg) -- Prince Andrew’s interview about his relationship with Jeffrey Epstein is dominating the news, but British politicians are avoiding the subject. From a political perspective the most interesting news is Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s announcement that every Conservative candidate has promised to back his Brexit deal.The Conservatives are also giving an outline of their plans for a post-Brexit immigration system, and Labour is talking about the National Health Service.For more on the U.K. election, click on ELECKey Developments:Conservatives drop fixed immigration targetLabour signs off its election manifestoLabour promises free dental care for allRaab Says No-Deal Brexit is Not Remotely Likely (10 a.m.)Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab was questioned about the plan for the future trade agreement with the EU on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show. While he admitted that it will necessarily be a compromise, he said there’s an opportunity to reach a “win-win” which is “great for the U.K. but also good for our European friends.”Asked if the U.K. could leave the EU without a deal, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said, “no, it’s not what we want to do.” He clarified, “I don’t think it’s remotely likely.”Labour Promises Free Dental Care for All (9 a.m.)Labour is continuing its approach of eye-catching offers for voters. After free broadband on Friday, Sunday’s was free dental care. Health spokesman Jon Ashworth told Sky News that people unable to afford to visit dentists were treating themselves using kits from budget shops.Conservatives Drop Fixed Immigration Target (8:45 a.m.)Security Minister Brandon Lewis told Sky News that after Brexit the Conservatives want to treat migrants from the European Union the same way as those from the rest of the world. He promised a five-year wait before people can claim welfare payments. But he backed away from the promise the Conservatives have been making -- and failing to keep -- for a decade, to reduce net immigration below 100,000 a year.“We’ll not set arbitrary targets,” he said. “I’m not getting into those kind of issues that we’ve had before. We will reduce immigration because when we leave the EU we will pass an immigration act that brings in a points-based system.”All Conservative Candidates Pledge to Back Brexit Deal (Overnight)If Prime Minister Boris Johnson wins a majority on Dec. 12, his chances of swiftly passing his Brexit deal are increased by his announcement that all his candidates have promised to back it. In an interview with the Sunday Telegraph, he said: “All 635 Conservative candidates standing at this election -- every single one of them -- has pledged to me that if elected they will vote in Parliament to pass my Brexit deal so we can end the uncertainty and finally leave the EU. I am offering a pact with the people: if you vote Conservative you can be 100% sure a majority Conservative government will unblock Parliament and get Brexit done.”It’s a significant pledge because the biggest obstacle to getting Brexit deals through Parliament has been the inability of Conservatives to agree about what kind of Brexit they want. But what it probably doesn’t cover is the next stage of Brexit, which is likely to revive arguments about how close the U.K. wants to be to the EU.Labour Agrees on Election Manifesto (Overnight)The opposition Labour Party signed off its policy platform for the election. It won’t be unveiled until Thursday, but some leaks include:A “Right to Food Act” introducing price controls, according to the MailA windfall tax on oil companies, according to the MailAn expansion of the sugar tax, according to the MailDropping a plan to allow private tenants to buy their homes, according to the FTEarlier:Corbyn Seeks to Use Britain’s NHS as Election BattlegroundPrince Andrew Bombs in BBC Interview, Raising More QuestionsTo contact the reporters on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.net;Lucy Meakin in London at lmeakin1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, James Amott, Sara MarleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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