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Letter To The Editor: Worry Over USA-DPRK Conflict

on August 19, 2017 - 7:17am
 
Dr. T. Douglas Reilly
Los Alamos
 
Much is reported regarding the war of words between the leaders of North Korea and the USA. Unfotunately, little is said about the history of North Korea; whose official name is the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK). North Korea is often called the Hermit Kingdom, because it is so closed to the outside world.
 
President Trump's words feed directly into the policy and mind of Kim Jong Un. I don't think continental USA is threatened by the North. However, South Korea (Republic of Korea (ROK)), Japan, and other islands are threatened by

Los Alamos Sarov Sister City Initiative Needs Community Support

on August 18, 2017 - 11:16am
Middle from left, former Deputy Fire Chief Justin Grider, former County Council Chair Geoff Rogers, Los Alamos Fire Chief Troy Hughes and County Manager Harry Burgess visited Los Alamos' sister city, Sarov, Russia in 2013. Courtesy photo
 
Students from Sarov, Russia pay a visit to UNM-LA in 2011. Courtesy photo
 
By KIRSTEN LASKEY
Los Alamos Daily Post 
 

National news reports daily on the ongoing drama between Russian and American politicians.

Science On Tap Presentation Targets Lightning

on August 18, 2017 - 8:35am

Tess Light discusses what is shocking about lightning during a Science on Tap presentation Thursday at Unquarked. She is with the Lab’s Space and Remote Sensing Group and touched on research that dates back to the 1960s when it was developed in connection with space payloads that monitor the Earth for evidence of nuclear treaty violation. Learning more about lightning is an outgrowth of those sensors. Courtesy photo

World Futures: Efficiency (Part Four)

on August 18, 2017 - 6:44am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

In part one of this efficiency series we defined efficiency as avoiding waste in doing something. Waste encompasses materials, energy, efforts, money and time. 

Looking at the sun-earth system, essentially the same amount of energy is delivered by the sun each day. Some of that energy is stored for future use and the rest must leave earth if a stable relationship is to be maintained.

Medical Imaging Research Leader Ken Hanson Of Los Alamos Receives SPIE Directors’ Award

on August 16, 2017 - 5:37pm

Medical imaging research scientist Dr. Ken Hanson from Los Alamos National Laboratory has been selected for a top award by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Dr. Hanson received the 2017 SPIE Directors’ Award last week during SPIE Optics + Photonics in San Diego, Calif. Photo by Vitaliy Gyrya

SPIE News:

BELLINGHAM, Wash., and SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Ken Hanson, a medical imaging research scientist at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), has been selected as this year’s recipient of a top award from SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Dr.

Redondo And Stauber Visit Popular Los Alamos History Museum Exhibit Creator Isao Hashimoto

on August 16, 2017 - 5:18pm

Los Alamos Historical Society Board Member Michael Redondo, left, and Los Alamos History Museum Director Judith Stauber with Japanese digital artist Isao Hashimoto during their recent visit to Japan on behalf of the Los Alamos/Japan Project. Hashimoto’s time lapse animation of the world’s nuclear explosions is a popular yet sobering Cold War exhibit in the Hans Bethe House in Los Alamos. Flashing lights on a world map indicate the locations of explosions that have occurred while differing sounds reveal the countries that conducted the tests.

LANL: Unique Imaging Of Dinosaur’s Skull Tells Evolutionary Tale

on August 15, 2017 - 4:19pm

A 3D image of Bistahieversor sealeyi, which was found in the Bisti Badlands in New Mexico and Imaged at Los Alamos' unique facilities. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Collaboration creates highest-resolution scan of a large tyrannosaur skull

Researchers using Los Alamos’ unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done.

NIST: ‘W’eird Signals: Listening In On The Eclipse

on August 15, 2017 - 3:12pm
Earth's ionosphere. Courtesy/NASA
 
NIST News:
 
Two years ago, I had never heard of the WWVB radio station. Today, it’s one of my favorites, but that’s not because it broadcasts a pleasant mix of Top 40 hits. (It doesn’t.) 
 
WWVB is a low-frequency station, operated by NIST, that provides precise time information to radio-controlled clocks across North America.

Supernova Hunters: ‘Get Them Young’

on August 15, 2017 - 9:30am

Bright blue dot: Supernovae such as SN 2017cbv appear as "stars that weren't there before," which is why multiple images taken over time are necessary to reveal their true identity. SN 2017cbv lies in the outskirts of a spiral galaxy called NGC 5643 that lies about 55 million light-years away and has about the same diameter as the Milky Way (~100,000 light-years). Data are from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Supernova Project and the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey. Courtesy/B.J. Fulton/Caltech)

UA News:

TUCSON, Ariz.

CIR Presents Michael S. Vigil, Former DEA Chief Of International Operations On Enforcing Border Aug. 24

on August 15, 2017 - 7:30am
Michael S. Vigil
 
CIR News:
 
At 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 24, Santa Fe Council on International Relations will welcome former Drug Enforcement Administration Chief of International Operations and author, Michael S. Vigil, to share some of his outstanding stories working in Mexico and at the border.
 
The presentation will take place at Hotel Santa Fe Hacienda and Spa, 1501 Paseo de Peralta.
 
Michael S. Vigil was born and raised in northern New Mexico where he was nurtured in a bilingual culture.

AGU: Human-Caused Warming Likely Leads To Recent Streak Of Record-Breaking Temperatures

on August 14, 2017 - 7:12am
Rising global temperatures are linked to more extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, and droughts. Courtesy/Luis Iranzo Navarro-Olivares
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  It is “extremely unlikely” 2014, 2015 and 2016 would have been the warmest consecutive years on record without the influence of human-caused climate change, according to the authors of a new study.  
 
Temperature records were first broken in 2014, when that year became the hottest year since global temperature records began in 1880. These temperatures were then surpassed in 2015 and 2016, making last year

Scientists Discover Cause Of Sea Level Hot Spots

on August 13, 2017 - 7:32am
The Indian River Lagoon, where salinity increases helped researchers discover a hot spot. Courtesy/NASA Kennedy Space Center
 
By STEPHANIE LIVINGSTON
AGU
 
Sea level rise hot spots — bursts of accelerated sea rise that last three to five years — happen along the U.S. East Coast thanks to a one-two punch from naturally occurring climate variations, a new University of Florida study shows.
 
After UF scientists identified a hot spot reaching from Cape Hatteras to Miami, they probed the causes by analyzing tidal and climate data for the U.S. eastern seaboard. The new study, published

Galactic Winds Push Researchers To Probe Galaxies At Unprecedented Scale

on August 12, 2017 - 6:53am
A density projection of a cool cloud getting destroyed as it is exposed to an outflow’s hot wind. Rather than getting pushed, the simulation shows the cold material instead becomes gradually heated until it is fully incorporated into the hot wind. Courtesy/Evan Schneider, Princeton University
 
OLCF News:
 
When astronomers peer into the universe, what they see often exceeds the limits of human understanding. Such is the case with low-mass galaxies—galaxies a fraction of the size of our own Milky Way.
 
These small, faint systems made up of millions or billions of stars, dust, and gas

Documentary ‘Blood Road’ In Los Alamos Sept. 7

on August 12, 2017 - 6:37am
Lookout. Courtesy photo
 
COMMUNITY News:
 
Ride the Ho Chi Minh Trail with ultra-endurance athlete Rebecca Rusch, as Red Bull Media House’s award-winning documentary Blood Road premieres Thursday, Sept. 7 at the Reel Deal Theater, 2551 Central Ave.

Blood Road captures Rebecca and her Vietnamese riding partner Huyen Nguyen’s 1,200-mile search for the place where Rebecca’s father, a U.S. Air Force pilot, was shot down in Laos more than 40 years earlier.

Heinrich, Tillis Lead Letter To U.S. International Trade Commission Opposing Tariffs Harming Solar Industry

on August 12, 2017 - 6:30am
U.S. SENATE News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Senators Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) and Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), along with a bipartisan group of senators, are urging the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) to not impose tariffs that would negatively affect the American solar industry.
 
In a letter to Chairman Rhonda Schmidtlein, the lawmakers—who both represent states that have a growing solar industry—expressed their deep concern with the pending Section 201 global safeguard case regarding solar cell and module manufacturing in the United States. The ITC will hold a public hearing on the

World Futures: Efficiency (Part Three)

on August 11, 2017 - 7:08am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

In the previous column, the implied conclusion was that humanity should convert to solar power for everything it does, both mechanically and biologically. But what does this really mean and HOW (the really hard part) do we do it? Energy consumption for humanity is driven by humanity itself. Let’s consider what this means.

A human being is, energy-wise, the equivalent of a 100 watt light bulb.

Los Alamos History Representatives Present Special Proclamation Extending Friendship To Nagasaki

on August 10, 2017 - 10:49am

Accepting the Special Proclamation Extending Friendship to Nagasaki is Akitoshi Nakamura, museum director of the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum. The proclamation was presented to the museum by Los Alamos History Museum Director Judith Stauber and Los Alamos Historical Society Board Member Michael Redondo Aug. 11, 2017 on the occasion of the Nagasaki Peace Memorial Ceremony. Courtesy photo

Los Alamos History Museum Director Judith Stauber Meets With Masahiro Sasaki In Hiroshima

on August 9, 2017 - 10:09am

In the past weeks, many visitors to the Los Alamos History Museum folded origami cranes to be sent to Japan in tribute to a young girl named Sadako, who folded more than 1,000 cranes, hoping to get her wish of recovering from radiation exposure from the bombing of Hiroshima. Sadly, it was a wish that was not granted. Sadako’s brother, Masahiro Sasaki, met with Los Alamos History Museum Director Judith Stauber during her current visit to Hiroshima.

Celebrate Perseid Meteor Shower At Valles Caldera

on August 7, 2017 - 11:07am

Perseid meteor shower. Courtesy/SPACE.com

VCNP News:

JEMEZ SPRINGS – The Valles Caldera National Preserve will celebrate the height of the Perseid meteor shower with a star party Saturday, Aug. 12. The preserve’s main gate will reopen 8-11 p.m. for this free event.

The star party will take place near the Valle Grande Entrance Station. Park staff and volunteers will provide short talks and telescopes for viewing. Visitors are encouraged to bring personal telescopes, blankets, and chairs for their stargazing pleasure.

Proclamation Of Friendship From Los Alamos County Presented To Officials In Hiroshima, Japan

on August 6, 2017 - 6:50am

Kenji Shiga, director of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, holds a Proclamation of Friendship from Los Alamos County. With him are Yasuyoshi Komizo, chairperson of the Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation; Judith Stauber, museum director of the Los Alamos History Museum; and Michael Redondo, member of the board of directors for the Los Alamos Historical Society. Courtesy photo

Representing Los Alamos, Michael Redondo and Judith Stauber respond to members of the Japanese media in Hiroshima. Courtesy photo

 

By SHARON SNYDER
Publications Director
Bathtub Row Press

A Los Alamos team arrived

Los Alamos History Museum Team Visits US Embassy In Tokyo, Japan

on August 5, 2017 - 5:23pm
Los Alamos History Museum Director Judith Stauber and Los Alamos Historical Society Board Member Michael Redondo met Aug. 3 with colleagues at the US Embassy in Tokyo. Courtesy photo
 
By SHARON SNYDER
Publications Director
Bathtub Row Press

Los Alamos History Museum Director Judith Stauber and Los Alamos Historical Society Board Member Michael Redondo met Aug. 3 with colleagues at the US Embassy in Tokyo. They shared news of the developing partnerships with our counterpart museums in Hiroshima and Nagasaki as well as their plans to attend the memorial ceremonies Aug. 6 and Aug.

World Futures: Efficiency (Part Two)

on August 4, 2017 - 6:06am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

In the previous column we looked at the world (earth) and concluded that it is best to maintain its temperature as a “constant” for the sake of humanity. At the same time it was noted that the release of earth’s stored energy from coal, gas, oil, etc., increases the “free” energy available.  

While this may be useful in the short run, the efficiency in maintaining the earth’s average temperature is affected by the chemicals and compounds released during energy extraction (e.g., greenhouse gases). It is better

Veterans Ben And Cresta Bateman Continue To Serve

on August 3, 2017 - 11:48am
Veterans Ben and Cresta Bateman of Los Alamos continue serving fellow warriors. Courtesy photo
 
Ben Bateman, left, with his forward observer on patrol in Iraq. Courtesy photo
 
Ben Bateman at a memorial for two of his comrades during his deployment in Ramadi, Iraq in 2007. Courtesy photo
 
By MAIRE O'NEILL
Los Alamos Daily Post
 

He served his country for eight and a half years as a commissioned officer in the U. S. Army, including three years as a Special Forces officer and a Green Beret. She spent seven and a half years in the Army as a Logistics Officer.

NASA: Total Solar Eclipse Monday, Aug. 21

on August 2, 2017 - 2:46pm

Total solar eclipse Aug. 21. Courtesy/NASA

NASA News:

All of North America will be treated Monday, Aug. 21, to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights ... a total solar eclipse.

This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Ore. to Charleston, S.C. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk.

NASA created this website (link) to provide a guide to this amazing

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