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More Scenes From 2017 Solar Eclipse

on August 22, 2017 - 10:01am

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by William Mead

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by William Mead

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by Aria Villareal

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by Aria Villareal

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by Aria Villareal

Scenes From Solar Eclipse Viewing At Overlook Park

on August 21, 2017 - 11:01pm

Retired Los Alamos scientist Johnathan Thron utilizes his Astroscan telescope to view this morning's solar eclipse from his vantage point on the lawn at Overlook Park in White Rock. He recalled as a young boy seeing an Astroscan telescope in the Edmund Scientific Company catalog and how cool he thought it was. He purchased this one about five years ago at an estate sale. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Johnathan Thron, left, and Duncan MacArthur view this morning's solar eclipse from Overlook Park in White Rock. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

From left, Duncan MacArthur,

Ally Mackey Watches Solar Eclipse

on August 21, 2017 - 10:33pm

Ally Mackey of Los Alamos seems fascinated by this morning's eclipse of the sun. Courtesy photo

Scenes Of Solar Eclipse Viewing In Nebraska

on August 21, 2017 - 5:38pm
Kerry Habiger of Los Alamos flew his plan and several local friends to view the solar eclipse this morning at the Fairmont Airfield in Nebraska. Courtesy/Kerry Habiger
 
Scene of people watching the solar eclipse this morning at the Fairmont Airfield in Nebraska. Courtesy/Kerry Habiger
 
Scene of people watching the solar eclipse this morning at the Fairmont Airfield in Nebraska. Courtesy/Kerry Habiger
 
Former Los Alamos resident Gary Warren and his wife Marilyn traveled from their home in Denver, four hours to Alliance, Nebr., this weekend to enjoy the festivities and wait for the

Los Alamos Checks Out Solar Eclipse

on August 21, 2017 - 4:10pm

A group of people check out the solar eclipse this morning on the deck of the Los Alamos Teen Center. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com 

Jessica Morgan models her special glasses at this morning's viewing of the solar eclipse from the deck of the Los Alamos Teen Center. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com 

Andy Fox checks out the solar eclipse this morning from the sidewalk in front of his department store in downtown Los Alamos. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com

Ronda Jones observes the solar eclipse from the parking lot in front of Shannon Corporation on Central Avenue.

View Of Solar Eclipse From Valle Grande

on August 21, 2017 - 4:01pm

View of the solar eclipse at 11:50 a.m. today from the Valle Grande where it was quite cloudy, but once in a while the sun would peek through, allowing a good view. Photo by Laurie Waters

Udall Touts Kirtland’s Critical Mission & Cutting-Edge Technology In Meeting With Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski

on August 21, 2017 - 6:47am
Udall and Pawlikowski agree that sequestration and threatened government shutdown would be dangerous for national security and service member morale. Courtesy photo
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE — Aug. 14, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall met with Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski, commander, Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) at the Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center to discuss Kirtland Air Force Base’s critical national security mission, cutting-edge technology, and future plans for harnessing the base’s research and development capabilities to maintain the United States’ technological advantage.
 
As a

LAPS: Solar Eclipse Safety Reminder

on August 20, 2017 - 2:28pm

LAPS Superintendent Dr. Kurt Steinhaus

Greetings from the Superintendent’s Desk!

Well … it looks like we may have clouds and maybe even rain during Monday’s Solar Eclipse. In any case, this spectacular event offers a rare teachable moment about science and safety.

In Los Alamos, the Partial Eclipse begins at about 10:22 a.m. when the Moon touches the Sun's edge. The Maximum Eclipse will be at about 11:46 a.m. when the Moon is closest to the center of the Sun.

Here are some safety reminders for students and staff on Monday: 

  • The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or

Earn Electro Mechanical Certificate In One Year

on August 20, 2017 - 5:41am

Technician in her workplace. Courtesy photo

UNM-LA News:

According to the recent Occupational Outlook Handbook, Electro Mechanical Technicians can make an average of over $21 an hour—and that is with a 1-year degree. Electro-mechanical technicians work with robotics, plastics, communication equipment, solar equipment and electronic circuits, usually in manufacturing facilities.

As a generalist, Electro-mechanical technicians have a broad set of skills that maintain a high demand for their services.

NOAA Satellites To Capture Moon’s Shadow Against Earth During 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Monday, Aug. 21

on August 20, 2017 - 5:29am

Photo by NASA/NOAA

NOAA News:

While most of America will be looking up during the solar eclipse Monday, America’s newest weather satellite, NOAA's GOES-16, will be looking down on the earth, tracking the moon’s shadow across the United States with its highly sophisticated Advanced Baseline Imager.

And NOAA plans to issue images of the eclipse from GOES-16 and its other polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites as they become available.

The satellite’s imager will provide three, high-resolution, color animations and still pictures of the eclipse.

LAHS Students Travel To Wyoming For Eclipse

on August 19, 2017 - 10:30am

From left, Maddie Mas, Maya Rogers, (on shoulders are Isabelle Crooker, Beth Short), LAHS Science Teacher Steph Miller and husband/volunteer Mark Mitchell, Prescott More, Elijah Pelofske, School Board Member/Volunteer Steve Boerigter, Stephen Gulley and Jack Benner. LAHS Science teacher/trip coordinator Deborah Grothaus isn’t on the trip due to prior commitments. Courtesy photo

LAHS News:

Eight Los Alamos High School students left Friday, to travel to Wyoming as part of the Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse Experiment.

The students are traveling with LAHS Science teacher Steph

Science On Tap Presentation Targets Lightning

on August 18, 2017 - 8:35am

Tess Light discusses what is shocking about lightning during a Science on Tap presentation Thursday at Unquarked. She is with the Lab’s Space and Remote Sensing Group and touched on research that dates back to the 1960s when it was developed in connection with space payloads that monitor the Earth for evidence of nuclear treaty violation. Learning more about lightning is an outgrowth of those sensors. Courtesy photo

World Futures: Efficiency (Part Four)

on August 18, 2017 - 6:44am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

In part one of this efficiency series we defined efficiency as avoiding waste in doing something. Waste encompasses materials, energy, efforts, money and time. 

Looking at the sun-earth system, essentially the same amount of energy is delivered by the sun each day. Some of that energy is stored for future use and the rest must leave earth if a stable relationship is to be maintained.

Medical Imaging Research Leader Ken Hanson Of Los Alamos Receives SPIE Directors’ Award

on August 16, 2017 - 5:37pm

Medical imaging research scientist Dr. Ken Hanson from Los Alamos National Laboratory has been selected for a top award by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Dr. Hanson received the 2017 SPIE Directors’ Award last week during SPIE Optics + Photonics in San Diego, Calif. Photo by Vitaliy Gyrya

SPIE News:

BELLINGHAM, Wash., and SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Ken Hanson, a medical imaging research scientist at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), has been selected as this year’s recipient of a top award from SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Dr.

Robotics Night Returns To Bradbury Science Museum!

on August 16, 2017 - 4:11pm

BSMA News:

Regional school robotics teams, and others, will demonstrate their robots to the public 5-8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 25 at Robotics Night at the Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Ave.

This free event is brought to you by the Bradbury Science Museum Association  (BSMA) and generously supported by New Mexico Bank & Trust. Visitors will have an opportunity to see the robots used by organizations such as Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos County Police Department and University of New Mexico Los Alamos.

Ann Ollila, who works on the Mars Rover, also will be on hand to show a

Science On Tap: What’s Shocking About Lightning

on August 16, 2017 - 2:18pm

Los Alamos Creative District News:

Attend Science On Tap at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 17 at UnQuarked in Central Park Square to learn the shocking truth about lightning.

Lightning strikes the earth more than one billion times each year, causing thousands of fatalities worldwide, and costs nearly a $1 billion in damages in the U.S. alone.

When strong updrafts cause layers of positive and negative charge to develop in the atmosphere, lightning discharges occur to restore the balance of the Earth’s electrical state.

AGU: Tracking A Solar Eruption Through Solar System

on August 16, 2017 - 6:47am
One effect of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is a sudden decrease in the number of galactic cosmic rays detected, called the Forbush decrease after the scientist who first described it. During the passage of the CME (depicted as the pale swath in the middle graphic), it acts like a protective bubble, temporarily sweeping aside the cosmic rays (depicted as the white flecks) and shielding the planet or spacecraft such that the impact of cosmic rays is reduced.

LANL: Unique Imaging Of Dinosaur’s Skull Tells Evolutionary Tale

on August 15, 2017 - 4:19pm

A 3D image of Bistahieversor sealeyi, which was found in the Bisti Badlands in New Mexico and Imaged at Los Alamos' unique facilities. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Collaboration creates highest-resolution scan of a large tyrannosaur skull

Researchers using Los Alamos’ unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done.

NIST: ‘W’eird Signals: Listening In On The Eclipse

on August 15, 2017 - 3:12pm
Earth's ionosphere. Courtesy/NASA
 
NIST News:
 
Two years ago, I had never heard of the WWVB radio station. Today, it’s one of my favorites, but that’s not because it broadcasts a pleasant mix of Top 40 hits. (It doesn’t.) 
 
WWVB is a low-frequency station, operated by NIST, that provides precise time information to radio-controlled clocks across North America.

Supernova Hunters: ‘Get Them Young’

on August 15, 2017 - 9:30am

Bright blue dot: Supernovae such as SN 2017cbv appear as "stars that weren't there before," which is why multiple images taken over time are necessary to reveal their true identity. SN 2017cbv lies in the outskirts of a spiral galaxy called NGC 5643 that lies about 55 million light-years away and has about the same diameter as the Milky Way (~100,000 light-years). Data are from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Supernova Project and the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey. Courtesy/B.J. Fulton/Caltech)

UA News:

TUCSON, Ariz.

AGU: Human-Caused Warming Likely Leads To Recent Streak Of Record-Breaking Temperatures

on August 14, 2017 - 7:12am
Rising global temperatures are linked to more extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, and droughts. Courtesy/Luis Iranzo Navarro-Olivares
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  It is “extremely unlikely” 2014, 2015 and 2016 would have been the warmest consecutive years on record without the influence of human-caused climate change, according to the authors of a new study.  
 
Temperature records were first broken in 2014, when that year became the hottest year since global temperature records began in 1880. These temperatures were then surpassed in 2015 and 2016, making last year

Scientists Discover Cause Of Sea Level Hot Spots

on August 13, 2017 - 7:32am
The Indian River Lagoon, where salinity increases helped researchers discover a hot spot. Courtesy/NASA Kennedy Space Center
 
By STEPHANIE LIVINGSTON
AGU
 
Sea level rise hot spots — bursts of accelerated sea rise that last three to five years — happen along the U.S. East Coast thanks to a one-two punch from naturally occurring climate variations, a new University of Florida study shows.
 
After UF scientists identified a hot spot reaching from Cape Hatteras to Miami, they probed the causes by analyzing tidal and climate data for the U.S. eastern seaboard. The new study, published

Galactic Winds Push Researchers To Probe Galaxies At Unprecedented Scale

on August 12, 2017 - 6:53am
A density projection of a cool cloud getting destroyed as it is exposed to an outflow’s hot wind. Rather than getting pushed, the simulation shows the cold material instead becomes gradually heated until it is fully incorporated into the hot wind. Courtesy/Evan Schneider, Princeton University
 
OLCF News:
 
When astronomers peer into the universe, what they see often exceeds the limits of human understanding. Such is the case with low-mass galaxies—galaxies a fraction of the size of our own Milky Way.
 
These small, faint systems made up of millions or billions of stars, dust, and gas

LAHS Student To Speak At Nature Center

on August 8, 2017 - 7:41am

Lillian Petersen

PEEC News:

The community is invited to join Los Alamos High School Student Lillian Petersen at the Los Alamos Nature Center at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15 as she presents her research on climate change.

Peterson has conducted three award-winning science fair projects that analyze fluctuating temperatures and precipitation rates, as well as how present-day extremes may impact crops in the future.

Peterson will give a basic overview of the science behind climate change and the correlations between CO2 and temperature for the past 800,000 years.

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