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LANL: Unique Imaging Of Dinosaur’s Skull Tells Evolutionary Tale

on August 15, 2017 - 4:19pm

A 3D image of Bistahieversor sealeyi, which was found in the Bisti Badlands in New Mexico and Imaged at Los Alamos' unique facilities. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Collaboration creates highest-resolution scan of a large tyrannosaur skull

Researchers using Los Alamos’ unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done.

NIST: ‘W’eird Signals: Listening In On The Eclipse

on August 15, 2017 - 3:12pm
Earth's ionosphere. Courtesy/NASA
 
NIST News:
 
Two years ago, I had never heard of the WWVB radio station. Today, it’s one of my favorites, but that’s not because it broadcasts a pleasant mix of Top 40 hits. (It doesn’t.) 
 
WWVB is a low-frequency station, operated by NIST, that provides precise time information to radio-controlled clocks across North America.

Supernova Hunters: ‘Get Them Young’

on August 15, 2017 - 9:30am

Bright blue dot: Supernovae such as SN 2017cbv appear as "stars that weren't there before," which is why multiple images taken over time are necessary to reveal their true identity. SN 2017cbv lies in the outskirts of a spiral galaxy called NGC 5643 that lies about 55 million light-years away and has about the same diameter as the Milky Way (~100,000 light-years). Data are from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Supernova Project and the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey. Courtesy/B.J. Fulton/Caltech)

UA News:

TUCSON, Ariz.

AGU: Human-Caused Warming Likely Leads To Recent Streak Of Record-Breaking Temperatures

on August 14, 2017 - 7:12am
Rising global temperatures are linked to more extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, and droughts. Courtesy/Luis Iranzo Navarro-Olivares
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  It is “extremely unlikely” 2014, 2015 and 2016 would have been the warmest consecutive years on record without the influence of human-caused climate change, according to the authors of a new study.  
 
Temperature records were first broken in 2014, when that year became the hottest year since global temperature records began in 1880. These temperatures were then surpassed in 2015 and 2016, making last year

Scientists Discover Cause Of Sea Level Hot Spots

on August 13, 2017 - 7:32am
The Indian River Lagoon, where salinity increases helped researchers discover a hot spot. Courtesy/NASA Kennedy Space Center
 
By STEPHANIE LIVINGSTON
AGU
 
Sea level rise hot spots — bursts of accelerated sea rise that last three to five years — happen along the U.S. East Coast thanks to a one-two punch from naturally occurring climate variations, a new University of Florida study shows.
 
After UF scientists identified a hot spot reaching from Cape Hatteras to Miami, they probed the causes by analyzing tidal and climate data for the U.S. eastern seaboard. The new study, published

Galactic Winds Push Researchers To Probe Galaxies At Unprecedented Scale

on August 12, 2017 - 6:53am
A density projection of a cool cloud getting destroyed as it is exposed to an outflow’s hot wind. Rather than getting pushed, the simulation shows the cold material instead becomes gradually heated until it is fully incorporated into the hot wind. Courtesy/Evan Schneider, Princeton University
 
OLCF News:
 
When astronomers peer into the universe, what they see often exceeds the limits of human understanding. Such is the case with low-mass galaxies—galaxies a fraction of the size of our own Milky Way.
 
These small, faint systems made up of millions or billions of stars, dust, and gas

LAHS Student To Speak At Nature Center

on August 8, 2017 - 7:41am

Lillian Petersen

PEEC News:

The community is invited to join Los Alamos High School Student Lillian Petersen at the Los Alamos Nature Center at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15 as she presents her research on climate change.

Peterson has conducted three award-winning science fair projects that analyze fluctuating temperatures and precipitation rates, as well as how present-day extremes may impact crops in the future.

Peterson will give a basic overview of the science behind climate change and the correlations between CO2 and temperature for the past 800,000 years.

Robotics Night At Bradbury Science Museum Aug. 25

on August 7, 2017 - 1:16pm

Students at a robotics event. Courtesy/BSM

BRADBURY SCIENCE MUSEUM News:

  • Stop by for fun with robotics teams of all kinds and their programmable friends

Regional school robotics teams, and others, will demonstrate their remote-manipulation abilities at a Robotics Night open to all at the Bradbury Science Museum. The event is 5-8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 25 and some of the teams will even provide an opportunity for visitors to manipulate the robots themselves.

Brought to you by the Bradbury Science Museum Association and generously supported by New Mexico Bank & Trust, visitors also will  have an

Celebrate Perseid Meteor Shower At Valles Caldera

on August 7, 2017 - 11:07am

Perseid meteor shower. Courtesy/SPACE.com

VCNP News:

JEMEZ SPRINGS – The Valles Caldera National Preserve will celebrate the height of the Perseid meteor shower with a star party Saturday, Aug. 12. The preserve’s main gate will reopen 8-11 p.m. for this free event.

The star party will take place near the Valle Grande Entrance Station. Park staff and volunteers will provide short talks and telescopes for viewing. Visitors are encouraged to bring personal telescopes, blankets, and chairs for their stargazing pleasure.

UPDATE: Hummingbird Monitoring Research Aug. 12

on August 4, 2017 - 6:34am
Broad-tailed Hummingbird. Photo by Bob Walker
 
Update: The time of the first session is changed to 7:30 a.m. Aug.12.
 
PEEC News:
 
Curious about the effects of climate change on hummingbird populations? Researcher Bob Walker will lead two groups, one at 7:30 a.m. and one at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 12, to the hummingbird monitoring site in Bandelier National Monument.
 
This location is one of a network of sites in the Western U.S. that tracks the impact of climate change on the movement and behavior of hummingbirds. To join one of the groups, visit peecnature.org to register.

New Program Explores University Of Chicago’s Role In Manhattan Project

on August 3, 2017 - 9:40am
AHF News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  “For the first time, atomic power had been released. It had been controlled and stopped,” Arthur Holly Compton declared.
 
Dec. 2, 1942, Compton, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, and 48 other Manhattan Project scientists and workers witnessed Chicago Pile-1 (CP-1), the first controlled, self-sustained nuclear chain reaction, go critical under Stagg Field at the University of Chicago.
 
This year marks the 75th anniversary of this landmark event that ushered in the Atomic Age.

Los Alamos County, LANL And Summer Interns Partner To Test Cutting Edge Technology

on August 3, 2017 - 8:17am

From left, UNM student Ben Narushof, UNM post-doctorate Ali Ozdagli, UNM Assistant Professor Dr. Fernando Moreu, LANL Engineering Institute's Dr. David Mascarenas, first year doctoral student JoAnn Ballor from Michigan, University of California in San Diego student Miranda Mellor, Southern University and AM College student Oscar McClain and County Engineer Eric Martinez are partnering to test hololens, which are being modeled by Moreu. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com

 

UNM Assistant Professor Dr. Fernando Moreu demonstrates how hololens work. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com

NASA: Total Solar Eclipse Monday, Aug. 21

on August 2, 2017 - 2:46pm

Total solar eclipse Aug. 21. Courtesy/NASA

NASA News:

All of North America will be treated Monday, Aug. 21, to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights ... a total solar eclipse.

This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Ore. to Charleston, S.C. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk.

NASA created this website (link) to provide a guide to this amazing

NASA Contracts With University Of Alabama At Birmingham To Develop New Orbiting Hardware

on August 1, 2017 - 9:49am
This conceptual drawing of Iceberg shows the modular nature of the units. Unlike MELFI's permanent structure, these units can be removed from the rack and returned to earth in the event that they ever need repairs or refurbishing. Courtesy photo
 
UAB News:
 
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.  NASA has a plan for the future of space research, and it is counting on University of Alabama at Birmingham engineers to help make it a reality.
 
The UAB Engineering Innovation and Technology Development research group recently received a contract worth $6.2 million over the next three years to design and build

LANL: Single-Photon Emitter Has Promise For Quantum Info-Processing

on July 31, 2017 - 1:00pm

LANL researchers have produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths, using chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes. These quantum light emitters are important for optically-based quantum information processing and information security, ultrasensitive sensing, metrology and imaging needs and as photon sources for quantum optics studies. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Carbon nanotubes form first known tunable room-temperature quantum emitters at telecom wavelengths

Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced the first

American Geophysical Union Announces 2017 Fellows

on July 27, 2017 - 9:08am

The American Geophysical Union headquarters in Washington, D.C. Courtesy/AGU

AGU News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The American Geophysical Union (AGU) today announced its 2017 Fellows, an honor given to individual AGU members who have made exceptional scientific contributions and gained prominence in their respective fields of Earth and space sciences.

Since the AGU Fellows program was established in 1962, and according to the organization’s bylaws, no more than 0.01 percent of the total membership of AGU is recognized annually.

Museums’ Fossil Mammal Research Project Gets Grant

on July 27, 2017 - 7:13am
Skull of an early Paleocene mammal collected from New Mexico from the collections of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Courtesy/NMMNHS
 
NSF News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE  The National Science Foundation has awarded the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science a $101,125 grant to support research on early placental mammals and STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) educational programs. 
 
The project, aims to shed light on how mammals fared after the Cretaceous extinction (K-Pg extinction), an event most famous for the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs.

Lightning Measure In Downtown Los Alamos Today

on July 26, 2017 - 1:35pm

Here is a measure of the lightning striking during a 30 minute period this afternoon in downtown Los Alamos. Courtesy/Morris B. Pongratz

LANL Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel To Receive Paul Evan Peters Award

on July 26, 2017 - 9:51am

Herbert Van De Sompel, an information scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will recieve the Paul Evan Peters Award.

LANL News:

  • Networked infrastructure to support scholarship among his contributions

Herbert Van de Sompel, research scientist at the Research Library of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been named the 2017 recipient of the Paul Evan Peters Award from the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), the Association of Research Libraries, and EDUCAUSE.

The award recognizes notable, lasting achievements in the creation and innovative use of network-based information

LAF&SF Features Hope: Science, Religion, And The Future At Unitarian Church 6 p.m. Wednesday

on July 24, 2017 - 8:36pm

LAF&SF News: 

Religions provide varieties of short-term, long-term, and eternal hopes and pathways to them. In our culture everyone is free to choose from these hopes or to live without them.

In this final session of the Faith and Science Forum, which is Wednesay, a panel is scheduled to share four faith perspectives on hope: Rabbi Jack Shlachter (also a scientist) will present Jewish hopes; Connon Odom (engineer and Los Alamos Church of Christ deacon) will present comments on Christian hope versus optimism from N.T.

NNSA Conducts Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey

on July 24, 2017 - 9:03am
NNSA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration’s (DOE/NNSA) conducted a low-altitude helicopter flight over portions of the Arlington, Va., area July 22 to measure naturally occurring background radiation.
 
Officials from NNSA announced that the radiation assessment covers approximately three square miles. A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Joint Base Andrews, was equipped with radiation sensing technology.
 
The helicopter flew in a grid pattern over the

NOAA’s Climate.Gov: Natural Wetlands, Tropical Agriculture Cause Methane Increases, Not Oil And Gas

on July 24, 2017 - 7:59am
Courtesy/NOAA
 
NOAA News:
 
“Agricultural and wetland emissions” from the planet’s tropical areas, not oil and gas activities in the United States, are more than likely responsible for a post-2007 global increase in methane levels, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate.gov.
 
But regulating or mitigating those methane sources could be difficult or impossible.
 
“Both of the likely contenders for the recent increase in emissions could be tricky to mitigate,” wrote Climate.gov’s Rebecca Lindsey and Michon Scott.

LANL: Neutrino Research Takes Giant Leap Forward

on July 20, 2017 - 4:31pm

This illustration shows the 800-mile/1300-kilometer path from Fermilab to the Sanford Underground Research Facility, straight through the earth. Courtesy/Fermilab
  • The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will send particles 800 miles to a mile-deep detector in South Dakota

LANL News:

In a unique groundbreaking ceremony July 21 at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D., an international group of dignitaries, scientists and engineers will mark the start of construction of a massive experiment that could change our understanding of the universe.

Savannah River Site Reaches Milestone In Supplying Tritium For National Defense

on July 20, 2017 - 4:20pm

SAVANNAH RIVER News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Savannah River Tritium Enterprise (SRTE) in Aiken, S.C., has conducted three tritium extractions in fiscal year 2017, marking the first time the Tritium Extraction Facility has performed more than one extraction in a year.

 “Achieving this significant milestone – especially doing it safely, securely, and in a disciplined manner – has required a tremendous team effort on the part of the entire SRTE team,” said Lt. Gen. Frank G.

Tonight ... Science On Tap: Preparing For The Eclipse

on July 20, 2017 - 4:13pm

LA CREATIVE DISTRICT News:

A full solar eclipse will pass over much of the United States Friday. It’s a rare opportunity indeed. Join us tonight at Science On Tap, at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked in Los Alamos to prepare!

The last such eclipse was in February of 1979 and the next one won’t be until October 2023. What makes these celestial transits special is an opportunity to view the sun’s corona (or its extensive low-density atmosphere) when it is visible. It is only during a total solar eclipse that such investigation is possible.

Join Galen Gisler, a Lab scientist with our XTD Integrated

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