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Scenes From Robotics Night At Bradbury Museum

on August 26, 2017 - 11:52am

Bradbury Science Museum was buzzing inside and out Friday during Robotics Night. The museum log book shows 795 people signed in for the popular event at which regional school robotics teams, and others, demonstrate their robots to the public. The free event is brought to the community by the Bradbury Science Museum Association  (BSMA) and generously supported by New Mexico Bank & Trust. Visitors had an opportunity to see the robots used by organizations such as Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos County Police Department and the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos.

EPFL: Urban Butterflies Under Threat Of Extinction

on August 26, 2017 - 9:11am

Small white butterfly (Pieris rapae). Photo/©Magali Deschamps-Cottin

 

By SANDRINE PERROUD
EPFL

According to an École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) study, butterflies living in urban areas face the threat of consanguinity and potential extinction. The research drew on the fields of genetics and urban development to quantify the trend across an entire city.

“Our research illustrates what is probably a widespread phenomenon: a drastic reduction in biodiversity in urban areas.

DNA Detectives Crack Case On Biothreat Look-alikes

on August 24, 2017 - 4:51pm

Principal investigator Jean Challacombe, left, assisted by Cheryl Gleasner who runs the sequencing machines, and who participated in the sequencing of most, if not all, of the Francisella genomes sequenced at Los Alamos. The device shown is an Illumina NextSeq 500, used in high-throughput sequencing in the laboratory. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Distinguishing virulent from harmless bacteria could aid biological surveillance

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are improving the identification of the bacterium that causes tularemia (“rabbit fever”) and considered a “Category A”

AGU: Elevated Zinc And Germanium Levels Bolster Evidence For Life On Mars

on August 24, 2017 - 4:39pm
This view from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows a site with a network of prominent mineral veins below a cap rock ridge on lower Mount Sharp. The APXS instrument on Curiosity discovered unusual material in these veins that has the highest germanium concentrations found in Gale Crater. Courtesy/NASA
 
AGU News:
 
New data gathered by the Mars Curiosity rover indicates a potential history of hydrothermal activity on the red planet, broadening the variety of habitable conditions once present there, scientists report in a new study.
 
Researchers found

Northern Receives $433,000 National Science Foundation Grant To Develop Cybersecurity Program

on August 23, 2017 - 2:45pm
NNMC News:
 
The College of Engineering and Technology (CET) at Northern New Mexico College (NNMC) has been awarded $433,689 by the National Science Foundation to develop a cybersecurity concentration in its ABET-accredited Bachelor in Information Engineering Technology (IET).
 
The Principal Investigator of the project is Dr. Jorge Crichigno, chair of the CET. The project is the result of several years of preparation that include state-of-the-art laboratory technology and advanced instruction capability in cybersecurity.
 
Dr.

World’s Tech Leaders Call On UN To Ban Killer Robots

on August 23, 2017 - 8:02am

Courtesy/Element Al

HSNW News:

An open letter by 116 leaders of robotics and artificial intelligence companies from 26 countries urges the United Nations against opening the “Pandora’s box” of lethal robot weapons.

A key organizer of the letter, Toby Walsh, Scientia Professor of Artificial Intelligence at UNSW, released it at the opening of the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2017) in Melbourne, the world’s pre-eminent gathering of top experts in artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics. Walsh is a member of the IJCAI 2017’s conference committee.

UNSW

Los Alamos Folks Travel Far Afield For Solar Eclipse

on August 22, 2017 - 10:25am

Los Alamos residence gather for a total eclipse party in Sun Valley, Ida., from left, Larry Maassen, Bill Heinz, Chris Ortega, Bill McArthur, Stan Heinz, Jennifer McArthur, JoAnn Heinz and Helen Ortega. Photo by Mary Beth Maassen

James Gourdoux of Los Alamos traveled to Oregon to view the solar Monday witnessed and experienced the eclipse in the ‘totality’ zone in Madras. Photo by James Gourdoux

In Madras, Ore., Monday when wildfire smoke from 30 miles away blew in, the partially eclipsed sun took on a reddish glow. Photo by James Gourdoux

More Scenes From 2017 Solar Eclipse

on August 22, 2017 - 10:01am

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by William Mead

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by William Mead

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by Aria Villareal

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by Aria Villareal

Scenes from the solar eclipse viewed Monday from Los Alamos. Photo by Aria Villareal

Scenes From Solar Eclipse Viewing At Overlook Park

on August 21, 2017 - 11:01pm

Retired Los Alamos scientist Johnathan Thron utilizes his Astroscan telescope to view this morning's solar eclipse from his vantage point on the lawn at Overlook Park in White Rock. He recalled as a young boy seeing an Astroscan telescope in the Edmund Scientific Company catalog and how cool he thought it was. He purchased this one about five years ago at an estate sale. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Johnathan Thron, left, and Duncan MacArthur view this morning's solar eclipse from Overlook Park in White Rock. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

From left, Duncan MacArthur,

Ally Mackey Watches Solar Eclipse

on August 21, 2017 - 10:33pm

Ally Mackey of Los Alamos seems fascinated by this morning's eclipse of the sun. Courtesy photo

Scenes Of Solar Eclipse Viewing In Nebraska

on August 21, 2017 - 5:38pm
Kerry Habiger of Los Alamos flew his plan and several local friends to view the solar eclipse this morning at the Fairmont Airfield in Nebraska. Courtesy/Kerry Habiger
 
Scene of people watching the solar eclipse this morning at the Fairmont Airfield in Nebraska. Courtesy/Kerry Habiger
 
Scene of people watching the solar eclipse this morning at the Fairmont Airfield in Nebraska. Courtesy/Kerry Habiger
 
Former Los Alamos resident Gary Warren and his wife Marilyn traveled from their home in Denver, four hours to Alliance, Nebr., this weekend to enjoy the festivities and wait for the

Los Alamos Checks Out Solar Eclipse

on August 21, 2017 - 4:10pm

A group of people check out the solar eclipse this morning on the deck of the Los Alamos Teen Center. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com 

Jessica Morgan models her special glasses at this morning's viewing of the solar eclipse from the deck of the Los Alamos Teen Center. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com 

Andy Fox checks out the solar eclipse this morning from the sidewalk in front of his department store in downtown Los Alamos. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com

Ronda Jones observes the solar eclipse from the parking lot in front of Shannon Corporation on Central Avenue.

View Of Solar Eclipse From Valle Grande

on August 21, 2017 - 4:01pm

View of the solar eclipse at 11:50 a.m. today from the Valle Grande where it was quite cloudy, but once in a while the sun would peek through, allowing a good view. Photo by Laurie Waters

Udall Touts Kirtland’s Critical Mission & Cutting-Edge Technology In Meeting With Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski

on August 21, 2017 - 6:47am
Udall and Pawlikowski agree that sequestration and threatened government shutdown would be dangerous for national security and service member morale. Courtesy photo
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE — Aug. 14, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall met with Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski, commander, Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) at the Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center to discuss Kirtland Air Force Base’s critical national security mission, cutting-edge technology, and future plans for harnessing the base’s research and development capabilities to maintain the United States’ technological advantage.
 
As a

LAPS: Solar Eclipse Safety Reminder

on August 20, 2017 - 2:28pm

LAPS Superintendent Dr. Kurt Steinhaus

Greetings from the Superintendent’s Desk!

Well … it looks like we may have clouds and maybe even rain during Monday’s Solar Eclipse. In any case, this spectacular event offers a rare teachable moment about science and safety.

In Los Alamos, the Partial Eclipse begins at about 10:22 a.m. when the Moon touches the Sun's edge. The Maximum Eclipse will be at about 11:46 a.m. when the Moon is closest to the center of the Sun.

Here are some safety reminders for students and staff on Monday: 

  • The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or

Earn Electro Mechanical Certificate In One Year

on August 20, 2017 - 5:41am

Technician in her workplace. Courtesy photo

UNM-LA News:

According to the recent Occupational Outlook Handbook, Electro Mechanical Technicians can make an average of over $21 an hour—and that is with a 1-year degree. Electro-mechanical technicians work with robotics, plastics, communication equipment, solar equipment and electronic circuits, usually in manufacturing facilities.

As a generalist, Electro-mechanical technicians have a broad set of skills that maintain a high demand for their services.

NOAA Satellites To Capture Moon’s Shadow Against Earth During 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Monday, Aug. 21

on August 20, 2017 - 5:29am

Photo by NASA/NOAA

NOAA News:

While most of America will be looking up during the solar eclipse Monday, America’s newest weather satellite, NOAA's GOES-16, will be looking down on the earth, tracking the moon’s shadow across the United States with its highly sophisticated Advanced Baseline Imager.

And NOAA plans to issue images of the eclipse from GOES-16 and its other polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites as they become available.

The satellite’s imager will provide three, high-resolution, color animations and still pictures of the eclipse.

LAHS Students Travel To Wyoming For Eclipse

on August 19, 2017 - 10:30am

From left, Maddie Mas, Maya Rogers, (on shoulders are Isabelle Crooker, Beth Short), LAHS Science Teacher Steph Miller and husband/volunteer Mark Mitchell, Prescott More, Elijah Pelofske, School Board Member/Volunteer Steve Boerigter, Stephen Gulley and Jack Benner. LAHS Science teacher/trip coordinator Deborah Grothaus isn’t on the trip due to prior commitments. Courtesy photo

LAHS News:

Eight Los Alamos High School students left Friday, to travel to Wyoming as part of the Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse Experiment.

The students are traveling with LAHS Science teacher Steph

Science On Tap Presentation Targets Lightning

on August 18, 2017 - 8:35am

Tess Light discusses what is shocking about lightning during a Science on Tap presentation Thursday at Unquarked. She is with the Lab’s Space and Remote Sensing Group and touched on research that dates back to the 1960s when it was developed in connection with space payloads that monitor the Earth for evidence of nuclear treaty violation. Learning more about lightning is an outgrowth of those sensors. Courtesy photo

World Futures: Efficiency (Part Four)

on August 18, 2017 - 6:44am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

In part one of this efficiency series we defined efficiency as avoiding waste in doing something. Waste encompasses materials, energy, efforts, money and time. 

Looking at the sun-earth system, essentially the same amount of energy is delivered by the sun each day. Some of that energy is stored for future use and the rest must leave earth if a stable relationship is to be maintained.

Medical Imaging Research Leader Ken Hanson Of Los Alamos Receives SPIE Directors’ Award

on August 16, 2017 - 5:37pm

Medical imaging research scientist Dr. Ken Hanson from Los Alamos National Laboratory has been selected for a top award by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Dr. Hanson received the 2017 SPIE Directors’ Award last week during SPIE Optics + Photonics in San Diego, Calif. Photo by Vitaliy Gyrya

SPIE News:

BELLINGHAM, Wash., and SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Ken Hanson, a medical imaging research scientist at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), has been selected as this year’s recipient of a top award from SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Dr.

Robotics Night Returns To Bradbury Science Museum!

on August 16, 2017 - 4:11pm

BSMA News:

Regional school robotics teams, and others, will demonstrate their robots to the public 5-8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 25 at Robotics Night at the Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Ave.

This free event is brought to you by the Bradbury Science Museum Association  (BSMA) and generously supported by New Mexico Bank & Trust. Visitors will have an opportunity to see the robots used by organizations such as Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos County Police Department and University of New Mexico Los Alamos.

Ann Ollila, who works on the Mars Rover, also will be on hand to show a

Science On Tap: What’s Shocking About Lightning

on August 16, 2017 - 2:18pm

Los Alamos Creative District News:

Attend Science On Tap at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 17 at UnQuarked in Central Park Square to learn the shocking truth about lightning.

Lightning strikes the earth more than one billion times each year, causing thousands of fatalities worldwide, and costs nearly a $1 billion in damages in the U.S. alone.

When strong updrafts cause layers of positive and negative charge to develop in the atmosphere, lightning discharges occur to restore the balance of the Earth’s electrical state.

AGU: Tracking A Solar Eruption Through Solar System

on August 16, 2017 - 6:47am
One effect of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is a sudden decrease in the number of galactic cosmic rays detected, called the Forbush decrease after the scientist who first described it. During the passage of the CME (depicted as the pale swath in the middle graphic), it acts like a protective bubble, temporarily sweeping aside the cosmic rays (depicted as the white flecks) and shielding the planet or spacecraft such that the impact of cosmic rays is reduced.

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