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Los Alamos National Laboratory Trinity Supercomputer Lands On Two Top-10 Lists

on November 17, 2017 - 4:23pm
The Trinity supercomputer, with both Xeon Haswell and the Xeon Phi Knights Landing processors, is the seventh fastest supercomputer on the TOP 500 list, and number three on the High Performance Conjugate Gradients Benchmark project. Courtesy photo
 
LANL News:
 
The Trinity Supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory was recently named as a top 10 supercomputer on two lists: it made number three on the High Performance Conjugate Gradients (HPCG) Benchmark project, and is number seven on the TOP500 list.
 
“Trinity has already made unique contributions to important national security

LANL: Scalable Clusters Make HPC R&D Easy As Raspberry Pi

on November 14, 2017 - 8:00am

The BitScope Pi Cluster Modules system creates an affordable, scalable, highly parallel testbed for high-performance-computing system-software developers. The system comprises five rack-mounted BitScope Pi Cluster Modules consisting of 3,000 cores using Raspberry Pi ARM processor boards, fully integrated with network switching infrastructure. Image: Bitscope. Courtesy/LANL

 

LANL News:

  • System with thousands of nodes brings affordable testbed to supercomputing system-software developers

A quest to help the systems software community work on very large supercomputers without having to

Los Alamos Faith & Science Forum Hosts Annual Meeting Following First Full Year As 501 C(3) Nonprofit

on November 13, 2017 - 7:55am

Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum President Nelson Hoffman presents a report to the annual meeting of the forum Sunday in the Nambe Room at Fuller Lodge. Photo by Morrie Pongratz

LAF&SF Treasurer Dan Winske describes his proposal for fall//winter reading groups during Sunday’s annual meeting at Fuller Lodge. Photo by Morrie Pongratz

LAF&SF News:

The Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum (LAF&SF) held its second annual meeting at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 12 in the Nambe Room at Fuller Lodge.

President Nelson Hoffman began the annual report by mentioning that this was the forum’s first full year

NNSA Awards $27.5 Million In Research Grants To Cornell And Notre Dame

on November 12, 2017 - 6:30am
NNSA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has named Cornell University and the University of Notre Dame as two of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) Centers of Excellence program funding recipients for their work in High Energy Density Physics and Radiochemistry. 
 
“These grants insure a pipeline of the next generation of scientists in areas of relevance to the stockpile stewardship mission,” said Dr.

UT Regents Postpone Vote On LANL Contract Proposal

on November 11, 2017 - 4:56pm

University of Texas News:

University of Texas System Board of Regents has postponed until Nov. 27 a vote on whether to submit a proposal to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to manage and operate Los Alamos National Laboratory.

In September the Board voted to spend $4.5 million to pursue the contract and when the final request for proposals was published Oct. 26, Deputy Chancellor David E. Daniel issued a statement that the UT team was “deeply engaged in developing the most responsive thoughtful plan possible” for future management of the Lab.

UT representatives have

LANL: First-Ever U.S. Experiments At New X-Ray Facility May Lead To Better Explosive Modeling

on November 6, 2017 - 10:24am

Courtesy image/acs.org

LANL News:

The detonation of carbon-rich high explosives yields solid carbon as a major constituent of the product mixture, and depending on the thermodynamic conditions behind the shock front, a variety of carbon allotropes and morphologies may form and evolve.

For the first time in the U.S., time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance.

Teach Plus Commends PED On Adoption Of Next Generation Science Standards

on October 31, 2017 - 10:16am
TPNM News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE ― Teach Plus New Mexico Friday issued the following statement on the Public Education Department (PED) decision to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) in their entirety:
 
“Teach Plus and Teach Plus teachers commend the New Mexico Public Education Department and Education Secretary-designate Christopher Ruszkowski on the decision to adopt the NGSS as written and in their entirety. Teach Plus teachers previously presented PED a letter with 500 signatures from New Mexico’s educators in support of NGSS.
 
“We’re thrilled that the PED listened to

Regional Coalition Of LANL Communities Tours San Ildefonso Sacred Area Above Chromium Plume

on October 28, 2017 - 5:28pm

San Ildefonso Gov. James Mountain hosted members of the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities Board Thursday at San Ildefonso Pueblo. From left, RCLC Executive Director Andrea Romero, Gov. Mountain, Espanola Mayor Alice Lucero, Los Alamos County Councilor Chris Chandler and RCLC Communications and Administrative Manager Scarlet Rendleman. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com

Members of the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities Board and staff were guests Thursday at San Ildefonso Pueblo where they visited the Pueblo Sacred Area below Los Alamos National Laboratory with Gov.

Seven Los Alamos Scientists Honored As APS Fellows

on October 26, 2017 - 4:19pm

The seven scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory named this year as Fellows of the American Physical Society (APS) are, clockwise from upper right, Vivien Zapf, Stuart A. Trugman, Laura Beth Smilowitz, John W. Lewellen, Christopher J. Fontes, Han Htoon and Toshihiko Kawano. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Fontes, Htoon, Kawano, Lewellen, Smilowitz, Trugman and Zapf noted for career accomplishments

Seven scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory were tapped this year as new Fellows of the American Physical Society (APS), a significant honor for the Laboratory and its people.

AGU: Scientists Use Seismic Waves When Touched Down To Measure Tornado Intensity

on October 25, 2017 - 11:20am
Tornado with dust and debris cloud forming at surface. Photo by NOAA Photo Library/Flickr
 
AGU News:
 
Seismic waves generated by tornadoes when they touch down could be used to measure a twister’s intensity, according to a new study.
 
The new research examined a catastrophic tornado that struck Joplin, Missouri in May 2011 and revealed the size of seismic waves produced by the tornado on the ground correlated with its strength.
 
The results suggest researchers can estimate a large tornado’s strength by measuring the seismic waves it creates, a finding that could open the door to

LAEC: Talk On Case For Modular Nuclear Reactors For Utility Scale Electricity Generation Saturday

on October 25, 2017 - 10:22am

Jack Bailey of NuScale Power

ASME/ASM/IEEE/ANS News:

The Los Alamos Engineering Council (ASME/ASM/IEEE/ANS) Dinner Meeting features a talk by Jack Bailey, vice president Business Development, NuScale Power, on the case for modular nuclear reactors for utility scale electricity generation, Saturday, Oct. 28 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, 1101 Bathtub Row.

  • Social Time: 5:30 p.m.
  • Dinner: 6 p.m.
  • Lecture: 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Abstract:

NuScale Power was incorporated in 2007 following a reactor concept initiated in 2000 as a collaborative project with Oregon State University, the Idaho National

Talk On 'Approximating The r-Process On Earth With Thermonuclear Explosions' 7 p.m. Today

on October 25, 2017 - 5:57am
 
LACACIS News:
 
Dr. Stephen Allen Becker Becker will talk about the process and show the results from nuclear testing of the rapid absorption of neutrons by nuclei (r-process), which occurs naturally in novae and supernovae and artificially in nuclear tests. 
 
Becker's talk is 7 p.m. today at the United Church at 2525 Canyon Road in Los Alamos.
 
Einsteinium and fermium were first synthesized and identified using nuclear explosions, as were many neutron-rich isotopes.
 
 

State Democratic Party Credits Public Engagement For PED Change Of Tune On Science Curriculum Standards

on October 25, 2017 - 5:51am
NMDP News:
 
The Democratic Party of New Mexico credited public engagement Oct. 18, for the New Mexico Public Education Department’s (PED) change in tune on science curriculum standards.
 
After public outrage was made clear, Gov. Susana Martinez’s PED announced that they would not be including the politicized changes they proposed in September.
 
“New Mexico was facing the possibility of Martinez’s PED altering science education in a way that would have put New Mexico kids at a disadvantage.

NIST: How Bright Is The Moon, Really?

on October 20, 2017 - 10:56am
Moonset on the NIST campus. These white domes will house the equipment used in the moon brightness experiment. Eventually the domes and equipment will be moved to the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. Courtesy/Jennifer Lauren Lee/NIST
 
NIST News:
 
The “inconstant moon,” as Shakespeare called it in Romeo and Juliet, is more reliable than his pair of star-crossed lovers might have thought. Now researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) plan to make the moon even more reliable with a new project to measure its brightness.
 
Scientists put the moon to work

PED Tweaks Proposed Science Education Standards

on October 19, 2017 - 5:12pm
Public Education Secretary Christopher Ruszkowski addresses the crowd during a reception Oct. 10 at the LAPS School Board Meeting Room. Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.com
 
By BONNIE J. GORDON
Los Alamos Daily Post

The New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) appeared to backpedal Tuesday on proposed changes to the New Mexico Science Education Standards, which are at odds with the Next Generation Science Standards developed by a consortium of states and the National Academy of Sciences.

New Mexico would be the 19th state to adopt the Standards.

More

LANL Scientists, Engineers Receive 2017 Fellows Prizes

on October 19, 2017 - 11:26am

Laboratory Fellows Prize recipients from top left,Tess Light, Nikolai Sinitsyn and Harshini Mukundan. Bottom, from left: Eric Flynn and Brian Albright. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Flynn, Mukundan, Sinitsyn, Albright and Light honored for outstanding research, leadership

Five Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have been awarded the Laboratory’s prestigious Fellows Prize in the areas of science or engineering research and leadership: Eric Flynn, Harshini Mukundan and Nikolai Sinitsyn were awarded the Fellows’ Prize for Outstanding Research, and Brian Albright and Tess Light were awarded

LANL’s Aditya Mohite Receives 2017 Resnick Award

on October 19, 2017 - 6:51am

Resnick Institute Director Jonas Peters, left, presents the 2017 Resnick Award to LANL’s Aditya Mohite. Courtesy photo 

Caltech’s Director of Sustainability Programs John Onderdonk with Symposium Speakers Scott Jasechko and LANL’s Aditya Mohite. Courtesy photo

 

By CAROL A. CLARK
Los Alamos Daily Post

Aditya Mohite of Los Alamos National Laboratory received the 2017 Resonate Award at a special reception following the 2017 Resnick Young Investigators Symposium at Caltech.

“I am flattered with this honor that has been bestowed upon me and want to thank my

LANL: Returning Student Scholarship Applications Now Being Accepted

on October 19, 2017 - 6:30am

LANL News:

Applications are now being accepted for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation Regional College/Returning Student Scholarship Fund (RCRS) January 2018 Awards. Deadline is Nov. 28.

Kathy Keith, Executive Director of the LANL Communities Partnership Office asked members of the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities Board Friday to spread word of the scholarship in their individual communities.

The RCRS awards scholarships to motivated students who are returning to a formal education after a hiatus for other pursuits such as trying different careers, the military or business

AGU: Waves In Lakes Make Waves In The Earth

on October 19, 2017 - 6:22am
Yellowstone Lake. Photo by Miguel Hermoso Cuesta
 
AGU News:
 
Beneath the peaceful rolling waves of a lake is a rumble, imperceptible to all but seismometers, that ripples into the earth like the waves ripple along the shore.
 
In a study published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth, scientists at the University of Utah report that these small seismic signals can aid science.
 
As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws.

Science On Tap: Learn About Magnets Tonight

on October 19, 2017 - 5:31am

LACDC News: 

Interested in magnetism? Join us to learn more at Science On Tap, at 5:30 p.m. today at UnQuarked Wine Bar, 145 Central Park Square.

Ross McDonald, with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory’s Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos, will talk about the motivation for using high magnetic fields for materials research. With applications ranging from trying to understand high temperature superconductivity to learning fundamental information about metals, he’ll cover the challenges and advantages of working with these incredibly strong fields.

EM Manager Doug Hintze Briefs RCLC Board

on October 18, 2017 - 11:11am

Doug Hintze, head of Environmental Management at the Los Alamos Field Office addresses Regional Coalition of LANL Communities board members Friday at their quarterly meeting in Espanola. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com
 
By MAIRE O’NEILL
Los Alamos Daily Post
 

Topping the list of main priorities for Fiscal Year 2017 is enhancing oversight and maintaining focus on safety, efficiency and transparency, said Doug Hintze, manager of the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management at the Los Alamos Field Office.

Hintze told board members at the Regional

Los Alamos Researchers And Supercomputers Help Interpret Latest LIGO Findings

on October 18, 2017 - 6:56am
LANL News:
 
Astrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends Aug. 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.
 
The event appeared to be a merger of two neutron stars—a specialty for the Los Alamos National Laboratory team of astrophysicists that Fryer leads. As the distant cosmic cataclysm unfolded, fresh observational data was pouring in from the observation—only the fifth published since the observatory began operating almost two years ago. ​
 
“As soon as I heard the news, I knew

AGU: Scientists Determine Source Of World’s Largest Mud Eruption

on October 17, 2017 - 11:30am
May 29, 2006, mud started erupting from several sites on the Indonesian island of Java and hasn’t stopped since. The eruption became known as Lusi and is the most destructive ongoing mud eruption in history. Courtesy Adriano Mazzini/The Lusi Lab Project.

Adriano Mazzini stands on top of dried mud from the Lusi eruption. Mazzini’s new research shows that deep underground, Lusi is connected to nearby volcanoes. Courtesy Adriano Mazzini/The Lusi Lab Project.

 

Lusi’s relentless sea of mud has buried some villages 40 meters (130 feet) deep and forced nearly 60,000 people from their homes.

Mars Geologic Features Get New Mexican & Spanish Names From El Camino Real

on October 17, 2017 - 11:17am
 
NMMNHS News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE  With names like Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Taos, and a giant crater the size of the Valles Caldera, future maps of the planet Mars will contain a lot of names familiar to the people of New Mexico.
 
Suggested by a member of the Mars Rover team based in New Mexico, the names are of cities and locales along the legendary El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro and are being used to name features visited by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during an important phase of its mission.
 
“As part of mapping Mars’ surface, we name rocks and places investigated by

SFCC Hosts STEM Conference Oct. 21

on October 17, 2017 - 7:10am
SFCC News:
 
Santa Community College hosts Fall 2017 Santa Fe Expanding Your Horizons featuring keynote address, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) workshops for girls in fifth through eighth grade led by women professionals, and a STEM & College Fair.
 
Conference begins from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sat., Oct. 21 at Santa Fe Community College, 6401 Richards Ave. The workshops will be in classrooms and labs primarily in the West Wing, upper and lower levels. The STEM & College Fair runs from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m. in the Jemez Rooms.
 
About 200 fifth- through eighth-grade girls will

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